CDC Vaccine Chief’s Brother No Longer Heads 2016-Related Investigations

Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein announcing the indictments of 13 Russians, July 13, 2018

Ironically, the big news the week of the election isn’t about any elected office. It’s about an appointed one. Jeff Sessions has just resigned as attorney general. His tenure was defined by his recusal from any investigations related to the 2016 election cycle. Even more ironic, the deputy attorney general who subsequently assumed that role had a much greater conflict than Sessions may have had by any reasonable measure. With Sessions now gone, oversight of 2016-related investigations including the Russia investigation has been passed to his former chief of staff and acting replacement.

But before Sessions resigned, oversight fell on the brother of CDC’s vaccine chief. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s sister is Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

President Trump’s criticism of toxic vaccines goes back a decade, long before he ran for office. He repeated those criticisms as a candidate on the campaign trial. His election reportedly caused employees at Messonnier’s workplace to cry in the hallways. How ironic that the election would also cause her brother to hold an appointment one rung below a cabinet member?

Throughout the course of Rosenstein’s tenure, he has wielded his unprecedented power with strong authority. He appointed the special counsel that continues to run the Russia investigation and ordered the FBI raid on the office of a now-former lawyer of Trump’s. Most recently, Rosenstein announced the indictments of 13 Russians who will never even stand trial.

Now the power that enabled him to do all that has been stripped away as he appears frozen in his position, if he keeps it. He will not even assume the title of acting attorney general. The reason for Jeff Sessions’ removal may not be about Jeff Sessions so much as it is about Rod Rosenstein.

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Vaccine Confidence Project Chief Married to GSK-Funded Employer

Heidi Larson, Peter Piot and Bill Gates, Credit: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Heidi Larson is the head of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s “Vaccine Confidence Project.” She is also married to the school’s director, Peter Piot, a longtime friend and beneficiary of GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty. In 2017, GlaxoSmithKline announced its “Sir Andrew Witty GSK Scholarships” through the London School of Medicine and Tropical Hygiene.

According Piot:

“I have known Andrew for more than thirty years, and I am delighted that his outstanding leadership and achievements are being honoured with this scholarship fund established in his name. It is a fitting tribute to his efforts to improve health around the world.”

“more than thirty years” – That’s about the entire time Witty has been at Glaxo, Glaxo Wellcome and GlaxoSmithKline. Piot makes clear that the scholarships play a major role at the school:

“The Sir Andrew Witty GSK Scholarships will play an important role in supporting the next generation of public and global health leaders in Africa. The MSc programme will equip them with the expertise to improve health services in their countries and communities, and will strengthen the continent’s capacity to respond to the important and changing health challenges it faces.”

Peter Piot’s school gets funding for scholarships named after his longtime friend, GSK’s CEO. Piot’s wife and employee tries to convince everybody that vaccines are safe. Piot and Larson happily take money from the pharmaceutical company that stole British and American vaccine-injured children’s medical records from a London hospital.

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How Paul Offit Profited Off The Backs of Kids Injured by GSK’s MMR Vaccine

“Get the fuck out of here! Piece of shit!”

That is what vaccine inventor Paul Offit yelled at Autism Investigated’s editor after being told that protection from personal injury litigation was making money off the backs of vaccine-injured kids. It turns out he was doing exactly that for his entire career, starting with his rotavirus vaccine’s development. At the time, the Wistar Institute he was working for was profiting from dangerous, since-withdrawn and secretly indemnified measles-mumps-rubella vaccines sold in the UK.

The co-inventor of Offit’s vaccine Stanley Plotkin is the inventor of the rubella component of all measles-mumps-rubella vaccines. Co-assignee of Offit’s vaccine patent Wistar Institute was the patent assignee of all rubella components of measles-mumps-rubella vaccines. That includes the now-withdrawn Pluserix vaccine introduced to the United Kingdom by Smith, Kline and French Laboratories, which previously funded Plotkin’s rubella vaccine development. During Pluserix’s introduction, Smith, Kline and French was an English subsidiary of Philadelphia-based SmithKline Beckman. Offit, Plotkin and Wistar were all based in Philadelphia as well.

Despite being already withdrawn in Canada for causing meningitis, Smith, Kline and French’s Pluserix vaccine was approved by the United Kingdom in 1988. In the supply agreement, the UK’s National Health Service secretly indemnified Smith, Kline and French Laboratories from liability. That made the British government liable for resulting vaccine injuries.

Subsequently, MMR vaccine injury litigation was shut down in the United Kingdom when federal funding was suddenly denied to lawsuits. Autism-vaccine research was shut down as well, the chief scientist fired and de-licensed. To this day, papers continue to be retracted including one by a long-deceased scientist. Medical records of children in the seminal 1998 vaccine-autism paper were stolen and expropriated by GlaxoSmithKline’s opposition researchers.

Paul Offit’s vaccine was developed with the dirty indemnity money that led to all of that. No wonder he still partners with GlaxoSmithKline to promote vaccines and dishonestly deny vaccine injury.

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Glaxo Cartoon Celebrates Theft of Vaccine-Injured Kids’ Medical Records

Below is a pro-vaccine cartoon with Autism Investigated commentary. (The all-capitalized letters are from the original cartoon.)

Backround:

Sir Mark Pepys – GlaxoSmithKline’s Medical Record-Leaking “Superstar”

Brian Deer Became Opposition Researcher for Glaxo to Avoid Litigation

Mark Pepys Made Medical School and Journal Lie Wakefield was Conflicted

British Medical Board Charged Doctors with Criticizing Toxic Vaccines

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Rachel Hotez is Just The Latest Autistic Victim of Glaxploitation Courtesy of Her Daddy GlaxoSmithKline

Glaxploitation

Glaxploitation victim Rachel Hotez with a GSK vaccine policy adviser, who happens to be her dad. Photo Credit: Texas Monthly

Unlike with the children in the 1998 autism-vaccine paper, GlaxoSmithKline doesn’t need to steal Rachel Hotez’s medical records. GSK already has them, because GSK is literally her daddy. Glaxploitation is easiest with a child of GlaxoSmithKline.

Peter Hotez was a total nobody before he was elevated to science chair of the GSK front group Sabin Vaccine Institute. He got that position in 1998. One can only imagine why…

In 2002, Hotez joined GSK’s policy advisory board on vaccines. That was the same year he orchestrated a petition against “misinformation” about vaccination, while his organization honored GSK’s first CEO. Hotez organized a GSK-funded meeting on bioterrorism that included vaccine industry talking head Paul Offit and pervert Thomas Frieden.

Also honored by Hotez’s front group that year was Stanley “Vaccine Soros” Plotkin. He is inventor of the rubella vaccine in the autism-causing measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

Hotez remained with Sabin Vaccine Institute until he stepped down as president just last year. Conveniently, that was when he announced he would be writing the book Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism. Authoring the book’s forward is Arthur Caplan, three-year bio”ethics” advisory committee chair at GlaxoSmithKline. Rachel Hotez is totally Glaxploited.

You know who the biggest target of Glaxploitation is though? Hannah Poling. GlaxoSmithKline wants her medical records like a mosquito wants blood. GSK also has much of the autism community unwittingly helping.

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MEDICAL RECORD THIEF MARK PEPYS CAUSES DR. BERNARD RIMLAND PAPER RETRACTION

Not even the dead are safe from sham retractions by Glaxo’s medical record thief Mark Pepys. Just before Autism Investigated reported on yet another retraction caused by Pepys, he caused the retraction of a paper by the late Dr. Bernard Rimland of all people. The paper was retracted explicitly because it linked vaccines to autism, cited the Wakefield paper that Pepys stole medical records of children in, came up at the top of Google and was cited by vaccine opponents including Autism Investigated’s editor.

The retraction was authored both by the editor of the journal Laboratory Medicine and by the senior author of Google opposition research for the vaccine industry. They wrote:

A single article that suggests a risk of autism associated with vaccination might not be expected to cause great harm; however, a recent study5 reported that the 2002 Rimland and McGinnis paper is frequently accessed and cited to support the position of those who oppose vaccination on the mistaken belief that it is a risk factor for autism. One of us (P.G. [Pietro Ghezzi]) was the senior author of that study.

Therefore, following the course taken by The Lancet, Lab Medicine has decided to withdraw the 2002 article by Rimland and McGinnis.

One of the reviewers of that “research” by Pietro Ghezzi was GSK Vaccines-backed epidemiologist Pier Lopalco. And who do you think is also a top cited researcher in Ghezzi’s work? You guessed it: Mark Pepys! The retraction was done weeks after Autism Investigated confirmed his role in the Wakefield coauthors’ retraction and confirmed from one of them that it was done just to distance themselves from the autism-vaccine link.

It was Dr. Rimland who was the reason parents are no longer blamed for their children’s autism and who was also one of the first scientists to pinpoint vaccines. Laboratory Medicine doesn’t deserve a paper by him. Instead, the journal will go into the ash heap of history with parent-blamer Bruno Bettelheim and Glaxo’s Sir Medical Record-Leaksalot Mark Pepys.

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Yehuda Shoenfeld’s Vaccine-Autoimmunity Paper Retracted by GlaxoSmithKline’s Mark Pepys

Israeli autoimmunity expert Dr. Yehuda Shoenfeld, ISRAEL21c

*Photo and headline updated.

Sir Mark Pepys did not just cause the 1998 autism-vaccine Wakefield paper’s interpretation retraction, ultimately leading to its full retraction. Pepys also caused the 2017 retraction of an autoimmunity study used in vaccine court for personal injury compensation.

Corresponding study author Yehuda Shoenfeld said of the retraction at the time:

Indeed it is [very] strange;  after one year of being in the journal and after extensive peer reviews of the paper suddenly we received a letter from the editors that SOMEBODY criticized the paper extensively??, it looks very strange and unprecedented. yet indeed at this time we have used this paper in Court for vaccine compensation to show that autoantibodies penetrate cells. Is it coincidental ????????

The retraction statement admitted it was done in part by the British Society of Rheumatology. The society’s founding president George Nuki approved the dangerous MMR vaccine in the UK and his son Paul Nuki was editor of GlaxoSmithKline opposition researcher Brian Deer. Deer had obtained medical records of children in the Wakefield paper that were stolen by Royal Free Hospital’s then-Head of Medicine Mark Pepys. That happened two years after he forced Dr. Andrew Wakefield out of the Royal Free.

Pepys is fully aware of Shoenfeld’s research. The two gave back-to-back talks at a Rheumatology meeting in London the year before he submitted his now-retracted paper. Just last year, both were speakers at the 2017 American College of Rheumatology meeting. Clearly Pepys – and by-extension GlaxoSmithKline – aren’t stopping with Wakefield.

In May, research from Japan on HPV vaccination’s adverse effects was also retracted. The first citation in that study about those adverse effects was one of Shoenfeld’s autoimmunity papers.

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GlaxoSmithKline Engineered Eli Lilly Thimerosal Protection Rider

In November 2002, an infamous rider was slipped into the Homeland Security Act which sought to shield former thimerosal maker Eli Lilly from litigation. But Lilly was not the pharmaceutical company behind the provision, European pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline was. The move enabled GSK to escape scrutiny over its toxic vaccinations. In GSK’s place was a company that had not made the mercury-based vaccine preservative for a decade and had not made childhood vaccines since the seventies.

Shielding Lilly from thimerosal litigation was done to protect vaccine manufacturers that use thimerosal, like GlaxoSmithKline. The rider was originally intended for a vaccine compensation bill pushed by then-Senator Bill Frist one year prior in response to rising lawsuits. His health policy adviser told Robert F. Kennedy Jr. in 2005:

“The lawsuits are of such magnitude that they could put vaccine producers out of business and limit our capacity to deal with a biological attack by terrorists.”

Although Frist received major contributions from Eli Lilly, he consistently enjoyed much greater financial support from GlaxoSmithKline. For the first five years that the thimerosal issue was raging, the company was Frist’s twelfth biggest campaign contributor. Merck was number 100. Lilly didn’t even make the top 100.

He was also far from GlaxoSmithKline’s only beneficiary. In mid-2002, GlaxoSmithKline was chief corporate sponsor of a GOP fundraiser in Washington headlined by President Bush.

Ultimately, Frist agreed to remove the rider from the law in January 2003. The repeal did not make Eli Lilly liable as all the thimerosal lawsuits would be forced into federal vaccine court anyway. However, the rider and subsequent fallout did help GlaxoSmithKline shirk public scrutiny.

The rider was slipped in two months before federal scientist-turned-GlaxoSmithKline employee Thomas Verstraeten submitted his thimerosal research for publication. The agreement to kill the rider happened just two weeks before Verstraeten’s submission. His earlier work for the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) had shown associations between thimerosal and autism. He then heavily manipulated his research to make those associations go away. Much of his earlier manipulation was done in a draft he presented at a secret meeting between CDC and drug companies including his future employer.

After the publication of GlaxoSmithKline fraud, Verstraeten published a letter asserting an all-out denial of any cover-up. Another Glaxo-supported doctor had just engineered a fraudulent coauthor retraction of the interpretation from the seminal 1998 autism-vaccine paper the month prior. Unlike the retraction, the Verstraeten letter never made big news.

Attention was diverted from the pharmaceutical company covering up thimerosal’s dangers to another pharmaceutical company that hadn’t made it in a decade. All of that company’s employees who first brought thimerosal to market 70 years earlier were long dead.

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GlaxoSmithKline Facebook Page Reveals Company Supports Internet Trolls

Editor’s commentary and troll response under GSK post feigning LGBTQ inclusion

Wondering who feeds anonymous online trolls that post pro-vaccine screeds? Wonder no more. GlaxoSmithKline’s Facebook page has given it away.

Autism Investigated’s editor posted links to several of this site’s posts on GSK’s Facebook page. One was Autism Investigated’s latest post about GlaxoSmithKline’s new She-E-O. The other was the post showing how Glaxo turned former journalist Brian Deer into its opposition researcher through threat of litigation. The former was placed under a GSK post about gender equality, the latter under equal opportunity for LGBTQ+ people.

Not a day went by before a Facebook account posting as “Marty James” responded to the Brian Deer post. “James” wrote, “Haha, what a joke of an article. Come back when you find any evidence of wrongdoing.”

Because a completely sparse Facebook account happened to be reading GSK’s page comments when it came across Autism Investigated’s and automatically sided with GSK. Right.

How stupid does GlaxoSmithKline think everybody is? Considering what it has already gotten away with, one can’t totally blame GSK for being cocky. The company did engineer the retraction of the 1998 autism-vaccine paper’s interpretation and steal vaccine-injured children’s medical records, don’t forget.

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Meet Emma Walmsley, GlaxoSmithKline’s New Shampoo She-E-O

Emma Walmsley has only been CEO of GlaxoSmithKline for 18 months, but she’s already getting lots of publicity. Fortune Magazine just named her its most powerful woman. Yet the former L’Oreal exec’s entire pharma experience does not predate 2010 when she was first hired at GSK. In stark contrast, her predecessor who hired her had racked up 32 years at Glaxo, GlaxoWellcome and GlaxoSmithKline respectively by the time he retired. Big pharma’s first She-E-O is clearly nothing but a smokescreen.

Walmsley knows she’s inexperienced, asserting her lack of “pharma baggage” is an advantage. She is obviously not oblivious to GlaxoSmithKline’s problems. After all, a GSK-funded doctor who was knighted with her predecessor stole medical records of vaccine-injured children at his hospital. Her appointment was mere reputation management, a diversity diversion by a company run by crooks.

The announcement of her takeover was conveniently made before the 2016 election. GlaxoSmithKline wanted to shatter the pharmaceutical glass ceiling before Hillary Clinton broke the presidential one. Needless to say, the latter glass ceiling wasn’t shattered. Still, Walmsley took over in early 2017 not long after Clinton would have become president had she not lost.

What makes this promotion all the more remarkable is that Emma Walmsley is supposedly the mother of four children. That raises the question: who is raising her kids now?

She is married, but she couldn’t possibly fulfill her maternal role and run GlaxoSmithKline at the same time. Either she is a corporate figurehead or an absentee mother. Neither speaks well of her ethics, the lack of which clearly reflect her crooked company.

GlaxoSmithKline has threatened journalists into becoming its opposition researchers and bullied scientists into retracting their own work on the dangers of its vaccines. Whatever her actual involvement is in running the company, Walmsley has chosen to attach her name to Glaxo. That speaks volumes all by itself.

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