Tag Archives: Crime

Attorney John Morgan Apologizes For Telling The Truth

A high-profile lawyer should not apologize for saying what’s already on the minds of virtually every anti-vaccinationist and vaccination skeptic. But that’s exactly what Attorney John Morgan of Morgan & Morgan did after producing perfectly reasonable tweets and Facebook posts like that which is above.

No, Morgan did not say that autism, ADHD, depression, pain or poor concentration cause school shootings. However, they do cause children to be much more likely to take medications like those he listed above. What all mass school shootings have in common is that the shooters were all on psychotropic drugs.

The idea of drugs causing people to commit homicide is nothing new. Age of Autism‘s late editor Dan Olmsted first became drawn to vaccination issues from his previous investigations of the anti-malarial drug Lariam. At first he thought it was only linked to suicide, only to learn that it could do even worse. The same certainly seems true of numerous other drugs, especially psychotropics.

Just don’t say that. Certainly don’t suggest what causes (*cough* vaccinations *cough*) people to have conditions that get them put on such medication in the first place. One can only imagine what Dan would think of such language-policing insanity that causes people to go from making observations like that above to all-too-familiar dreck like…

Did Brush With Serial Killer Plant Demirjian Paranoia?

Aida Demirjian (photo credit: Palisades Tennis Club of Newport Beach), child 11’s mother, apparently escaped the notorious serial killer nicknamed the “Bedroom Basher.” Could this explain why Richard Demirjian (call at 949 718 0180 to share your story, but be civil) was paranoid enough to believe Dr. Andrew Wakefield fabricated his son’s records despite also believing his son is vaccine-injured? From PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA vs. GERALD PARKER (a.k.a. the Bedroom Basher):

Aida Demirjian 
On February 2, 1980, Aida Demirjian lived in an apartment at 1033
East Cordova Street in Pasadena. She arrived home around 10:OO that night
and parked in the complex’s underground parking structure. As she was
getting out of her car and locking the door, a black man hit her two or three
times with an iron rod. She fell down and pretended to be unconscious,
hoping that he would just take her purse and leave, but he kept hitting her.
There was blood all over. She got up and started running and yelling for
help, but he ran after her and grabbed her and hit her again. She held up her
hands to defend herself and he hit her in the hand, breaking her thumb and
ring and middle fingers. He pulled her necklace off and drug her a couple
of yards. She pretended to be unconscious again as he stood at her feet
looking through her purse. When he lifted up her skirt, she got up and ran
to the first floor and banged on her manager’s door, asking for help. She
was hospitalized that night and had surgery to repair a skull fracture. Her
fingers were permanently injured; she cannot bend her middle finger at the
first joint and her ring finger is now shorter and crooked. (10 RT 2 1 12-
2 120.)
Donald Barra lived in an apartment across the street from
Demirjian’s complex. Shortly after 10:OO p.m. on February 2, 1980, he
went to investigate a “blood-curdling, moaning kind of scream.” He
determined that the noise was coming from a lower parking structure across
Cordova Street. He walked down into the parking structure but could not
see much because it was dark. He eventually saw a black man wearing a
light T-shirt and darker pants standing over a whimpering Demirjian with
some kind of a bludgeon in his hand. Barra yelled at the man to stop. He
stopped for a second and turned around and looked at Barra, then started to
“saunter” around. Barra told him again to stop where he was and the man
“took off like a rabbit” up the ramp and East on Cordova. Barra then turned
his attention to Demirjian. Her head was matted with blood and her right
hand was severely damaged. Her fingers had swelled so much they looked
like “ballpark franks.” She wore quite a few rings and the paramedics had
to cut them off to save her fingers. Later that evening police officers took
Barra to look at a person who was in custody. As far as his clothes and
general appearance, the person looked similar to the man Barra had seen
earlier that day. (10 RT 2 120-2 124.)
Pasadena police officer Dennis McQueeny was dispatched around
10:20 p.m. to respond to the scene. He noticed appellant when he was
about a half-block from the apartment complex. The knees of appellant’s
pants were scuffed, and they appeared to be stained. McQueeny stopped
and confronted appellant and saw that he had blood on his pants, shirt, and
hands. Appellant gave McQueeny identification indicating he was a staff
sergeant in the Marine Corps. McQueeny kept appellant at the location
until Barra came by, then took him into custody. According to McQueeny,
appellant was calm, cooperative, and compliant. They had no trouble
communicating. He did not see any evidence of intoxication. (1 0 RT 2 124-
2 130.) Another officer found a metal pipe, approximately eight inches long
and three inches in diameter, near one of three puddles of blood on the floor
of the parking structure. It had what appeared to be blood on it. He found a
gold and pearl necklace three parking spaces away from the metal pipe. (10
RT 227 1 .)
Exhibit 122 (10 CT 3 176-3 189) was introduced as evidence. Along
with fingerprints and photographs from the Department of Corrections, it
included a certified copy of appellant’s conviction in Los Angeles County
for robbery. (10 CT 3 180; 10 RT 2170,2254.)

On June 5, 2017, the California Supreme Court upheld Gerald Parker’s death sentence.