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The New American Calls Bullshit on Measles Exploitation

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Measles Outbreak Prompts Outrage Against Anti-vaxers

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An outbreak of measles amongst a small unvaccinated population in Minnesota could spell trouble for the anti-vax community as it may prompt yet another push for forced vaccinations by vaccine advocates. The media is using the latest outbreak to criticize anti-vax groups and tout the “benefits” of vaccinations, despite the science that links vaccines to a number of long-term health issues.

In the United States, every child by the age of 18 is expected to receive a total of 69 doses of 16 different vaccines, most of which use controversial ingredients. Many parents of autistic children have concluded that these vaccines and the vaccination schedule utilized in the United States play a role in the rise of autism and have sounded the alarm for other parents to think twice before administering vaccines to their children. Unfortunately, those skeptics then become prime targets whenever there is an outbreak of a disease for which a vaccine exists.

On May 8, for example, CNN reported that of the 48 confirmed cases of measles in Minnesota, 41 are Somali-Americans who “bought into the fears that vaccines cause autism, and thus eschewed getting vaccines for their children.” CNN cites Kristen Ehresmann, director of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division at the Minnesota Department of Health, who claims that the Somali-Americans fell prey to the anti-vaccine groups that targeted them after it was discovered in 2008 that a disproportionate number of Somali children were receiving special education for autism. According to the Washington Post, a University of Minnesota study found that Somali children were about as likely as white children to be identified with autism, although they were more likely to have intellectual disabilities.

Ehresmann added, “I want to be very clear that this outbreak has nothing to do with being Somali. It’s just the sheer fact of being unvaccinated.”

In its overzealous effort to defend vaccines, CNN cited a pro-vaccine expert whose claims seem to undermine assertions that vaccines and autism have no relationship. Michael Osterholm, regents professor and director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and a former state epidemiologist for Minnesota, said, “Between 2000 and roughly 2008, the Somali community in Minnesota actually had some of the highest vaccination rates for 2-year-olds of any population in the state.”

As observed by Barbara Loe Fisher, founder of the National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC),

The truth is, nobody knows how many vaccine victims there are in America, how many of the 1 in 6 learning disabled children; or the 1 in 9 with asthma; or the 1 in 100 who develop autism; or the 1 in 450 who become diabetic, can trace their chronic inflammation, disease and disability back to vaccine reactions that have been dismissed by public health officials and doctors for the past century as just “a coincidence.”

And even when scientists are forced to confront the data, they simply dismiss it on the grounds that there is not enough evidence to establish a “causal” relationship.

But sadly, it seems the scientific community is not interested in conducting any studies that might establish a causal relationship. According to public testimony of Dr. Heather Rice at the Vermont Department of Health, “No true prospective, randomized and controlled study of health outcomes of vaccinated people versus unvaccinated has ever been conducted by the U.S. by CDC or any other agency in the 50 years or more of an accelerating schedule of vaccinations.”

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says measles “is so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected.” But if the pro-vaccine community is confident in the effectiveness of vaccinations, then they should have no fears of contraction.

And whether the CDC can even be considered a trustworthy entity is another issue. According to a controversial 2016 film directed by autism advocate Dr. Andrew Wakefield entitled Vaxxed: From Coverup to Catastrophe, the CDC was behind a major cover-up of the MMR vaccine’s connection to autism. The documentary is based on revelations by CDC whistleblower Dr. William Thompson, a former senior scientist at the CDC who admits that the organization destroyed evidence linking the MMR vaccination to autism.

But while Thompson’s revelations were groundbreaking, the mainstream media virtually staged an all-out blackout. Instead, it waits for stories of “measles outbreaks” to launch a media firestorm.

“Anti-vaccine groups blamed in Minnesota measles outbreak,” CNN reports. “Measles outbreak in Minnesota caused by vaccine skeptics,” an NBC News headline reads. “Unfounded autism fears are fueling Minnesota’s measles outbreak,” NPR opines. And a Fox News headline reads, “Minnesota measles outbreak: Officials say Somali families ‘targeted with misinformation.’” When it comes to vaccinations, all mainstream media outlets seem to be on the same side.

Perhaps that “bipartisan” approach to this subject is because the mainstream media is virtually owned by the pharmaceutical industry. According to Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the chairman of the World Mercury Project, which seeks a global ban on mercury, the press has been “coopted” by the pharmaceutical industry. Big Pharma, he says, is the single largest contributor to advertising revenue to network news divisions, at approximately $5.4 billion per year.

“A network news broadcast these days … is just a vehicle for selling pharmaceutical products,” Kennedy asserts.

In fact, it was the media’s silence on the CDC whistleblower that inspired Del Bigtree, an Emmy award-winning medical journalist, to produce Vaxxed:

I want the media to be held accountable for the weeks and weeks of covering a measles outbreak at Disneyland, terrifying people when only 644 people were affected. That’s .000002% of the people in this country, which effectively translates to zero, when one in 45 kids is now diagnosed with autism. I’d like the media to explain why it won’t cover the story of a top CDC scientist who admits they committed fraud on the MMR study when they discovered a causal link between the vaccine and autism, a disease that is accelerating so fast it could spell the end of our society. If that’s not a story, what is?

Thompson’s revelations did garner the attention of Florida Republican Congressman Bill Posey, who called on Congress to conduct a formal investigation into the allegations against the CDC in July 2015:

I believe it’s our duty to ensure that the documents that Dr. Thompson provided are not ignored. Therefore I will provide them to members of Congress and the house committees upon request. Considering the nature of the whistleblower’s documents, as well as the involvement of the CDC, a hearing and a thorough investigation is warranted. So, I ask Mr. Speaker, I beg, I implore my colleagues on the appropriations committees to please, please take such action.

Unfortunately, Posey’s request fell on deaf ears, while media portrayal of the Minnesota measles outbreak does not. 

Related: ALL MMR VAX BACKERS CAUSE AUTISM AND MEASLES

Obama Contradicts Himself on Vaccines, Paul and Christie Get Slammed

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By Jake Crosby

Likely GOP presidential candidates Senator Rand Paul and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie are being slammed in the media for giving their own honest and consistent positions on the role of vaccination choice, with Paul further slammed for bringing awareness to vaccine injury. Yet it was President Barack Obama who gave contradictory stances on vaccinations in an interview he gave before the Super Bowl in the wake of the Disneyland measles outbreak.

In response to NBC’s Today Show co-host Savannah Guthrie, President Obama gave the following stance on vaccination (boldface mine):

“The science is, you know, pretty indisputable. We’ve looked at this again and again. There is every reason to get vaccinated, but there aren’t reasons to not.”

But then in that same interview, Obama gave as a reason to vaccinate the protection of people who have reasons not to vaccinate (boldface mine):

“…the folks who can’t get vaccinated – small infants for example or the people with certain, uh you know, vulnerabilities that, that can’t get vaccinated – they suddenly become much more vulnerable. They’re counting on us to create this protective fence because most people have been vaccinated.”

It was “certain…vulnerabilities” Obama cited as reasons for why some people cannot get vaccinated shortly after saying there weren’t any reasons to not get vaccinated. Obama then told viewers to listen to the CDC, even though a senior CDC scientist William Thompson recently came out as a whistleblower against the federal suppression of research results associating measles, mumps and rubella vaccination with autism in certain vulnerable children.

Yet the media is attacking Senator Paul and Governor Christie for making the argument that the decision to vaccinate cannot fall solely on the state. Christie’s office was even forced to release a follow-up statement hours after his comments. Rand Paul was further attacked for his commentary on adverse neurological side-effects from vaccination.

Meanwhile, the media praises Obama even after he gave contradictory opinions in the same interview on national television that went completely missed by his own interviewer. Such a glaring double-standard appears to be the fruits of an ongoing campaign by the Obama Administration to censor critics of government vaccination policy in media as first revealed five years ago by his then-HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius in an interview with Reader’s Digest:

“We have reached out to media outlets to try to get them to not give the views of these people equal weight in their reporting…”

HHS officials would later feign ignorance of the veracity of the above remark in response to queries by HDNet journalist Greg Dobbs. However, the CDC has been known to train journalists on how to report hot-button issues such as autism and vaccine safety in which CDC would clearly have a stake.

Whereas in the seventies it was the media that exposed the president’s role in the cover-up of the Watergate scandal, today the media is helping the president prolong the CDC cover-up of vaccine side-effects. That is more than evident in how mainstream media attacks Christie and Paul for their views while giving Obama a hall pass for his misleading statements about vaccine safety on NBC before he told viewers to listen to the CDC.

A chief instigator of the attacks on Christie is none other than the communications director of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Mo Elleithee, who said in the below statement:

“If he wants to actually be a leader, then he should stop bowing to junk science and take a cue from President Obama by showing leadership that promotes facts and keeps our children and our nation safe”

Ironically, it is Barack Obama who should stop bowing to junk science and show leadership that promotes facts and keeps children and our nation safe. Making consistent and non-contradictory statements would help.

Christie may not be ready to tackle the issue of vaccine safety the way Paul has, but both likely presidential candidates show much more competent leadership than that of the man currently sitting in the White House. The American people deserve far better than Obama or any presidential candidate who adopts DNC’s position on vaccines for that matter.

See on The Epoch Times.

Did Andrew Wakefield Out The CDC Whistleblower For Money?

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By Jake Crosby

Five months have elapsed since senior CDC scientist Dr. William Thompson – who spoke out about the suppression of research results linking autism to early measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine administration – was prematurely outed without his permission by de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield. Yet one question still lingers: why did he do it?

The answer may lie in what Wakefield’s critics have accused him of being motivated by for the last decade: money.

Much of Wakefield’s personal income comes from his role as president of the Strategic Autism Initiative (SAI), a non-profit he runs for the purposes of funding autism research. However, only a small portion of SAI’s contributions actually went to autism research; the vast majority went into his pocket according to SAI’s latest available 990 form. He had also solicited donations for a libel suit he filed in Texas that was eventually dismissed on jurisdictional grounds where he was ordered to pay defendants’ legal costs.

Contributions for both Wakefield’s lawsuit and his non-profit came from the very community of parents of vaccine-injured children who Wakefield claims to be helping. His image and relevance to that community are what help him receive money from that community. As his lawsuit was winding down, his hijacking of the CDC whistleblower story gave Wakefield just what he would have needed to reinvigorate his hero role to the very people who had come to follow him so devoutly. It would also give him yet another reason to solicit money from his supporters.

What started as the release of online videos that mentioned the whistleblower by name and included surreptitious recordings of his voice became a two-month campaign to raise money for a documentary film Wakefield said he was making about the whistleblower saga. Yet only $2,325 – far below the lofty goal of $230,000 – was actually raised. And despite an ongoing campaign by Wakefield’s supporters to circulate the whistleblower story on Twitter and other social media sites, those efforts have had no appreciable impact on the story’s exposure. Nonetheless, Wakefield succeeded in galvanizing support for himself from his own community of followers even though his interference in the story likely eliminated any chance of widespread media coverage.

Now in 2015, prospects of the whistleblower William Thompson being able to testify about the CDC’s role in suppressing research associating autism with MMR vaccination before Congress appears to be supported by little else than rumors on blogs. A recent outbreak of measles in Disneyland has led to The Washington Post among other papers blaming the outbreak on Wakefield, dubbing him the “high priest” of the “anti-vaccine movement” despite never mentioning Thompson or any other examples of misconduct at CDC.

15 years after a researcher at CDC concluded a causal vaccine-autism association in email to colleagues while studying the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal, media focus remains fixed on Wakefield thanks in no small part to his own actions. Not only does that benefit CDC, but Wakefield also stands to benefit by the reinforcement of his image as a “martyr” to his support base that still provides him with sympathy and financial backing.

Tragically, the people who do not benefit at all while suffering the most from this ongoing narrative are the very community of people that is still largely misguided enough to keep following him without examining his possible motives.

Addendum: See on The Epoch Times.