Tag Archives: Ghostwriter

FAKE NEWS REVEALED, Part II: The Ghostwriter Behind The Kennedy Retraction

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Scott Rosenberg, ghostwriter behind Kennedy retraction

With President-Elect Trump’s consideration of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. as chair of a committee on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, the shills of fake news have been relentlessly trying to convince Trump’s team to reconsider. The most widely circulated argument has been Salon.com’s retraction of Kennedy’s article “Deadly Immunitywhere he wrote on the government cover-up of the dangers of the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal. The retraction was based on a bogus rumor that Rolling Stone secretly retracted Kennedy’s article and was later condemned as editorial cowardice” by Salon.com’s founding editor-in-chief David Talbot. But now there is even more news that should bury the retraction of Kennedy’s work once and for all in this exclusive two-part series by Autism Investigated: the Salon.com editor-in-chief who took credit for the retraction of Deadly Immunity didn’t even read it, didn’t write its retraction statement and didn’t interview the person who started the rumor as portrayed on Salon.com. The first part of the series provided proof that he didn’t, this second part reveals who did.

That person is the MediaShift blogger whom the editor-in-chief misrepresented Kennedy’s article to in Part I: former Salon.com managing editor Scott Rosenberg. Rosenberg attended theScience Online 2011 annual conference with the Rolling Stone rumor-starter Seth Mnookin. The event ran from January 13-15 right before the article was retracted on the 16th. Both Mnookin and Rosenberg had books of theirs featured at the conference:

Scott Rosenberg – Not Kerry Lauerman – Interviewed Seth Mnookin

Rosenberg was also still contributing to Salon through 2011 when Kennedy’s piece was retracted. Yet Rosenberg would never disclose that in his MediaShift blog about Salon’s retraction of Kennedy’s article weeks later. Seth Mnookin’s first tweet about Salon’s interview used Science Online 2011 hashtag #scio11 – specifically for tweets Science Online meeting commentary and follow-up discussions – even though Lauerman was never at the conference while Rosenberg was:

 That was the first and last tweet by Mnookin about Salon’s coverage of his book and the removal of Kennedy’s article using the #scio11 hashtag. The purpose of the #scio11 hashtag according to a conference attendee was to denote tweets about Science Online 2011 “meeting commentary and follow-up discussions” by conference participants:”One goal of the conference was to be as inclusive as possible by livestreaming several of the sessions online and encouraging liberal use of the Twitter hashtag, #scio11, for meeting commentary and follow-up discussions.” Mnookin was also trying to score interviews at Science Online 2011 to pitch his book prior to the conference:

A Twitter search for both Mnookin and Rosenberg’s Twitter handles reveals substantial interaction between them at Science Online 2011, as well as Rosenberg tweeting about Salon’s retraction of his piece almost immediately after it happened. In contrast – Lauerman had no participation in Science Online 2011; a search with the #scio11 hashtag and his twitter handle yields nothing. Lauerman was not even in virtual attendance, despite it being an option for conference participants who could not physically be at the conference. He simply was not there at all.

Lauerman’s Motive For Retraction: Payback to Rosenberg in Exchange for Career Advancement

Kerry Lauerman had quite a rapport with Scott Rosenberg going back many years, specifically concerning the project Lauerman launched that was Rosenberg’s idea. This is what Rosenberg said about Lauerman in 2008:

“The Open Salon that opens its doors today — it’s been in private beta for a while — is an outgrowth of the work I did back then, but of course over the past year the project has evolved much further…It’s the work of Kerry Lauerman and his team — and, now that the participants are using it, it’s in the hands of Salon’s readers the people formerly known as Salon’s readers, to make of it something new and exciting.”

The implementation of Rosenberg’s idea by Lauerman was followed by his rapid accession to editor-in-chief just two years later. So naturally, Lauerman would feel indebted to Rosenberg which would in turn be a motive for Lauerman having Kennedy’s article retracted to please Rosenberg if Lauerman felt Rosenberg’s idea got him the highest editorial position. Lauerman not having personally interviewed Mnookin, read Kennedy’s piece or wrote Salon.com‘s retraction statement would also explain why Lauerman refused to even take Kennedy’s calls the night Lauerman told Kennedy via email that Salon.com would retract his piece on the night of the 15th – the last night of the conference attended by Mnookin and Rosenberg. 

Interestingly – following the retraction – Rosenberg went on to run the annual Science Online conferences regularly attended by Mnookin until the organization became insolvent and shut down in 2014. Lauerman did not read Kennedy’s article when it was pulled, did not interview Mnookin and likely yanked “Deadly Immunity” as a favor for a friend with strong Mnookin connections. Yet now years later, the result of this crooked behavior is used as justification to block Robert F. Kennedy Jr. from becoming chair of a badly needed commission to stop the ongoing harm being committed against innocent infants. Fortunately, the president-elect and the vice president-elect both seem pretty happy to have Robert F. Kennedy Jr. on their team.

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*Please send this article to the president-elect and vice president-elect*

FAKE NEWS REVEALED, Part I: Salon Editor Who “Retracted” Kennedy’s Article Didn’t Even Read It

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Kerry Lauerman, Salon.com editor-in-chief who deleted Robert F. Kennedy Jr. ‘s article without even reading it, is now executive “news” editor of Mic.

With President-Elect Trump’s consideration of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. as chair of a committee on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, the shills of fake news have been relentlessly trying to convince Trump’s team to reconsider. The most widely circulated argument has been Salon.com’s retraction of Kennedy’s article “Deadly Immunity”where he wrote on the government cover-up of the dangers of the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal. The retraction was based on a bogus rumor that Rolling Stone secretly retracted Kennedy’s article and was later condemned as editorial cowardice” by Salon.com’s founding editor-in-chief David Talbot. But now there is even more news that should bury the retraction of Kennedy’s work once and for all in this exclusive two-part series by Autism Investigated: the Salon.com editor-in-chief who took credit for the retraction of “Deadly Immunity” didn’t even read it, didn’t write its retraction statement and didn’t interview the person who started the rumor as portrayed on the site. This first part of the series provides proof that he didn’t, the second part will reveal who did.

That editor, Kerry Lauerman, has since made quite a career out of running outlets that delivered fake news. In 2014 he was hired by The Washington Post and in 2015 was made the newspaper’s National Projects Editor. Among Lauerman’s roles, according to the newspaper, would be “the planning, execution and coverage of some critically important events during the political year, such as the presidential debate and forum we’re co-sponsoring with Univision, and in guiding our preparations for the political conventions.” During that stint of Lauerman’s at WaPo, the now-president-elect stripped the newspaper of its press credentials because of its dishonest reporting.

Then the month before the election, Lauerman left the newspaper to become executive “news” editor of Mic – a creepy far-left site aimed at millennials that makes sensationalized stories out of the way men sit in subways. He still edits Micwhere he now pushes garbage rumors about the president-elect while he still attacks Kennedy.

Proof Lauerman Didn’t Read “Deadly Immunity”

A blog post for MediaShift dated January 24, 2011 provided a quote of Lauerman’s following the retraction. It proves Lauerman’s basic grasp of both the article and the context of the Kennedy quote he provided was so poor, Lauerman could not have read the article he censored:  

“It’s a seriously flawed story we feared could do real harm. People who have bought into the anti-vaccine panic have created a health crisis, and a flawed report that feeds that hysteria poses a real threat. With this particular story, the unproven logic that animates the piece — as when Kennedy says the link between thimerosal and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real’ — is not easily excisable, and no matter how many editor’s notes or Drudge-like, red-flashing sirens you place on a story to warn readers, there will be those who will take a well-known, respected American at his word. We simply didn’t think it was worth that risk.” (boldface mine) 

How Lauerman quoted Kennedy’s article to justify its retraction completely contradicts how the retraction statement quoted that same sentence in his article on Salon.com:   

In 2005, Salon published online an exclusive story by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. that offered an explosive premise: that the mercury-based thimerosal compound present in vaccines until 2001 was dangerous, and that he was convinced that the link between thimerosal and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real.” (boldface mine)

The intro to Salon.com’s interview with Seth Mnookin – news fabricator extraordinaire who started the rumor that Rolling Stone canned Kennedy’s article – also contradicts the context in which Lauerman quoted Kennedy:  

In 2005, we published a report, “Deadly Immunity,” by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. that appeared in Rolling Stone magazine (Salon had a co-publishing arrangement with the magazine at the time), in which Kennedy wrote that he became convinced that the link between thimerosal [a mercury-based compound once used in vaccines] and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real” (boldface mine)

The only apparent place that misleadingly quoted Kennedy’s article the same way Lauerman did in 2011 was a CBS Moneywatch piece that also helped spread the false rumor that Rolling Stone pulled Kennedy’s article. That would mean Lauerman only read that piece instead of actually reading Deadly Immunity”.  And as one can see from a search result, there do not appear to be any other January 2011 sources that chopped the quote from Kennedy’s article to look like an absolute statement the way Lauerman did. The only way for Lauerman to have reasonably misrepresented Kennedy’s piece and quoted it out of context the way he did would have been for Lauerman not to have read his article and to have only read the CBS Moneywatch article with the chopped quote from Kennedy’s piece. Had Lauerman even bothered to read “Deadly Immunity”, he would know that his whole claimed pretense for retracting it was totally false. But the facts didn’t matter to him, as they continue to not matter to Salon.com. 

Since his reasoning is contradicted by both the retraction statement and the Salon.com interview as well, that would mean Lauerman did not write or conduct them either. But if he didn’t do either for Salon.com, who did? That will be revealed in Part II of this series, where the ghostwriter will be outed.

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*Please send this article to the president-elect and vice president-elect*

Autism Investigated Announces Awards for 2014

Announcing Autism Investigated’s Awards for 2014, and the winners are…

Scientist of the Year: Dr. Boyd Haley

Dr. Boyd Haley is a chemist and international authority on mercury toxicity who has not been afraid to speak out against wrongdoing. Case-in-point: when Robert F. Kennedy Jr. chopped chapters on thimerosal’s role in causing autism out of his book hypocritically named, “Thimerosal: Let The Science Speak,” Dr. Haley pulled no punches. “Those were the most important chapters for the American people to see,” he said in an exclusive interview with Autism Investigated. Not surprisingly, much of Kennedy’s book drew from the work of Dr. Haley. Autism Investigated still values the totality of Dr. Haley’s scientific contributions and those of others like him, even though Kennedy no longer does.

Scoop of the Year: Kennedy’s Ghostwriter Defended Thimerosal

Freelance writer Adam Hadhazy (pictured above) was revealed as one of the ghostwriters of Robert F. Kennedy’s “Thimerosal: Let The Science Speak,” according to the file properties of an unpublished manuscript posted on Autism Investigated last summer. Hadhazy has a history of defending harmful vaccines and their ingredients – including the mercury-based preservative thimerosal – and of being an apologist for the CDC cover-up of those harms. Yet, he was hired to ghostwrite (write material for someone else who is the named author) Kennedy’s book that was intended to catalyze the complete removal of thimerosal from vaccines. The scoop on Hadhazy’s ghostwriting came shortly after The Washington Post reported that Kennedy removed chapters from his book for being “too combustible,” thereby not letting the science “speak” as his book title claims.

Quote of the Year: Whistleblower Confirms Wakefield Outed Him Without Permission

Whistleblower Betrayal

Shortly after he was outed without permission, whistleblower Dr. William Thompson released a statement confirming his allegations that CDC committed research misconduct in omitting associations of autism with early measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination. But even more significantly, his statement confirmed that his identity was released online along with recordings of his voice without his permission by de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield. Thompson’s voice was recorded without his knowledge by Wakefield’s colleague Dr. Brian Hooker. This too was confirmed in the following excerpt from the statement:

“I was not, however, aware that he was recording any of our conversations, nor was I given any choice regarding whether my name would be made public or my voice would be put on the Internet.”

More information about Wakefield’s betrayal of Dr. Thompson and its repercussions can be found below in the description of Autism Investigated’s “Event of the Year.”

Irony of the Year: Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Joins Thimerosal Cover-Up

As previously stated, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has essentially joined the thimerosal cover-up of harms from the substance by chopping out chapters on its toxicity from his own book, despite naming his book “Thimerosal: Let The Science Speak.” He had even enlisted the help of ghostwriter Adam Hadhazy, who had previously defended thimerosal as described in Autism Investigated’s “Scoop of the Year.” It had been reported over the summer that Kennedy may add the chapters back in, though that has yet to happen after many months since then. In taking the chapters out, Kennedy has broken his promise at an autism conference in 2013 that he will publish his book if HHS does not fully remove thimerosal from vaccines. Well, thimerosal is still in vaccines but the chapters on autism are still out of his book.

Event of the Year: Andrew Wakefield Betrays CDC Whistleblower

Autism Investigated’s event of the year is also the catastrophic blunder of the decade. Andrew Wakefield has released the identity of CDC whistleblower William Thompson along with snippets of his voice recordings without his permission. Wakefield then lied to Autism Investigated by claiming he had obtained permission from Thompson, which was then completely dispelled by Thompson’s statement. As a consequence of Wakefield’s actions, any chance of widespread media coverage was killed since the story was prematurely scooped and tainted with his name. This may subsequently jeopardize the success or even the possibility of a congressional investigation or hearing into the matter. To deny Wakefield betrayed Thompson, supporters of Wakefield point to a purported apology Thompson made to him via text messaging. But if real, the apology was made under heavily coerced circumstances since Thompson knew that anything he shared that was subsequently shared with Wakefield could be prematurely revealed by him at will without any outside input.

See on The Epoch Times.

Kennedy May Publish Deleted Chapters, But Still Backtracks on Thimerosal

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By Jake Crosby

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. might restore chapters he deleted from his book “Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak,” according to the blog of Focus Autism. Meanwhile, a letter Kennedy had written to Medical News Today earlier this year took a strong, unambiguous stand on the autism-thimerosal link, suggesting it was only very recently that he backtracked from his position that thimerosal causes autism. However, based on Kennedy’s recent comments in the press, he shows no sign of reverting to his original position, even if he does add the chapters back in which would presumably include those on autism.

In an August 7th blog post titled “RFK Jr.’s book is bringing a lot of attention to the problem, both positive and negative,” Focus Autism founder and philanthropist Barry Segal wrote:

“The good news is that supposedly Kennedy (who is now being beaten up by both sides) is going to publish the missing chapters, which will add strength to his argument.”

If true, it would prove a very fortunate development in the Kennedy book saga. Unfortunately, he still has yet to revert to his previous stance that thimerosal causes autism.

In an article he wrote on AlterNet titled “Invitation to Open Debate On Thimerosal” that ran the day before Segal’s blog post, Kennedy made multiple statements backtracking from his original position that autism is caused by thimerosal in vaccines (boldface mine):

“In fact most of the criticisms have focused on how thimerosal has been linked to autism. That is not the subject of the book, nor is that claimed within the book.”

“The argument is not whether it causes autism, which is not clearly proven, although this curiously been [sic] the focus of recent criticism of the book (which no one had read to date).”

“This book, a meta-review essentially, does not pretend to answer the thorny question of whether thimerosal is a culprit in the autism epidemic.”

“…a possible thimerosal-autism connection is far from a settled question.”

“…thimerosal might, in some cases, contribute to autism causation.”

These statements by Kennedy represent a position that is markedly different from one expressed in a letter he had written to Medical News Today several months prior on March 28th, 2014 (boldface mine):

“For two years, I have worked with a team of doctors and respected scientific researchers to assemble every published study on Thimeresol, the mercury based vaccine preservative still present in dangerous concentrations in US flu vaccines and pediatric vaccines worldwide. We have assembled and digested close to five hundred peer reviewed published pharmacological, toxicological, clinical, animal and human epidemiological studies in leading publications. These studies overwhelmingly implicate Thimeresol in a host of neurological injuries including ADD, ADHD, Speech delay, Language Delay, Tics, Misery Disorder and Autism.”

He also did not mince words when discussing the CDC or its study led by Epidemic Intelligence Services’ Dr. Thomas Verstraeten (boldface mine):

Instead of cleaning house, coming clean and embracing transparency, the CDC has gone to extremes to conceal its vaccine safety data from the public and from outside scientists and researchers. The agency claims to have lost or misplaced the raw data underlying it’s only study of  Thimeresol’s impacts on US cohorts. That in house study – the so called Verstratten [sic] study – initially showed strong dose related causative links between Thimeresol exposure and autism.”

While Dr. Mark Hyman reportedly convinced Kennedy to remove chapters from his book in the first place, the mystery remains as to who convinced Kennedy to backtrack from his position on thimerosal’s harms. Certainly Dr. Hyman is a suspect, as is Kennedy’s ghostwriter Adam Hadhazy who once wrote in defense of the toxin. Or, the person behind Kennedy’s backtrack could be someone else entirely.

Regardless of who it is, Kennedy’s book will remain a disappointingly inadequate call for an unequivocal ban on thimerosal – with or without the additional chapters – unless revisions are made in the book’s preface, introduction and conclusion. In the meantime, Kennedy has yet to even add the chapters back in as only the butchered version of his book is in print.

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.

Dr. Boyd Haley on Deletions from Kennedy’s Book: “Those were the most important chapters for the American people to see.”

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By Jake Crosby

Mercury toxicity expert and chemistry professor emeritus Dr. Boyd Haley has joined Dr. Andrew Wakefield as yet another prominent scientist who has spoken out against the censorship of book chapters by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Though Age of Autism quoted Dr. Haley as supporting Kennedy in the wake of much media criticism, he was not aware Kennedy chopped chapters including those on autism from his book when speaking to Age of Autism.

“I was just recently made aware of this,” he said. “Needless to say this is very disappointing news.”

“I’m just dramatically disappointed,” Dr. Haley later reiterated again concerning the removal of chapters and sections from Kennedy’s book, Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak. “There was no reason to take chapters out.”

Referring to the excuse cited in The Washington Post that sections of the book were “too combustible,” Dr. Haley responded: “I think that’s a weak excuse. It’s supposed to be a combustible book.”

Dr. Haley went on, “I’m really kind of in shock. It never crossed my mind he’d [Kennedy’d] take those chapters out.” Noting he played a major role in assisting Kennedy with his book, Dr. Haley also stated, “He never consulted with me before he did.”

Regarding the chapters Kennedy took out, Dr. Haley said: “Those were the most important chapters for the American people to see.”

He noted, however, that the issue of thimerosal concerned more than just autism: “Sweden’s Sudden Infant Death Syndrome rate went down after thimerosal was taken out.”

Quantifying the scope of infant death rates in the US, Dr. Haley said, “If we had Sweden’s [death rate], we’d have 16,000 less [infants] die,” per year.

Dr. Haley was also perplexed about Dr. Mark Hyman who convinced Kennedy to strike chapters:

“I don’t know Hyman at all.”

Dr. Haley was also shocked to learn that one of Kennedy’s ghostwriters Adam Hadhazy previously defended thimerosal, asking:

“Why would he hire someone like that to ghostwrite his book?”

Referring to the Washington Post article interviewing Kennedy and Hyman, Dr. Haley said he was most disappointed in how they responded to claims that autism went up as thimerosal was removed:

“That’s a huge mistake to say autism went up as thimerosal was taken out,” he stated. “They don’t have data [on children born] past 2002. The shelf life of some of those vaccines is five years.”

He further noted that thimerosal remains in flu vaccines given to infants and pregnant women, acknowledging that unpublished data from a CDC-commissioned study showed prenatal thimerosal exposure increased risk for regressive ASD 8-fold.

Haley concluded, “If you can’t counter that argument, then you’re not making an argument. You’re shooting from the hip.”

He also said of the CDC’s autism surveillance, “It’s not accurate, and it’s not a well-designed system.” Indeed, it does not track the same regions, nor can its estimates be generalized to the rest of the country.

Pointing out more generally that CDC is not credible and often lies, Dr. Haley noted, “These people play fast and loose with the facts. The real problem we have is that they’re not honest people.”

Then referring to his issues with autism organizations in general and of Autism Investigated’s coverage of some of those groups, he said:

“I get so frustrated working with autism groups. You shed a lot of light on it.”

Just before word broke that Kennedy pulled the chapters, Dr. Haley said Kennedy called him asking if he knew of a study from Iceland that supposedly proved thimerosal did not cause autism. Dr. Haley said he hadn’t seen it and neither had Kennedy, “but he sounded convinced by it,” Dr. Haley told me. Kennedy did not reveal to Dr. Haley who told him about it, though someone close to Kennedy is apparently working hard to make him doubt that thimerosal causes autism.

Yet a study from Denmark published last year showed a decline in autism after thimerosal’s removal. One of the authors on that study was copied on an email exchange a decade earlier noting the prevalence and incidence was declining. This exchange was discussed in one of the autism chapters Kennedy took out of his book, titled  “Autism Rates Decline When Thimerosal Exposure Levels Are Reduced.”

Dr. Haley stated that Kennedy’s book should have been a call to action for the removal of thimerosal, but believed that to be undermined by Kennedy’s new decision to strike the chapters and backtrack from his position that thimerosal causes autism.

Towards the end of the conversation, Dr. Haley promised:

“I’ll support you in what you’re trying to do.”

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.

Kennedy’s Ghostwriter Defended Thimerosal

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ghostwriter: A person whose job it is to write material for someone else who is the named author. – Oxford Dictionaries

By Jake Crosby

As surprising as Robert F. Kennedy Jr. chopping out the chapters on autism from his book “Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak” while saying there is no proof thimerosal causes autism, is the identity of one of the professional writers he hired to write his book for him. The creator listed in the file properties of Kennedy’s unpublished manuscript had actually defended the neurotoxic vaccine preservative thimerosal, which appears to shed light on Kennedy’s decision to strike the chapters.

Adam Hadhazy is a “freelance science writer” with his own professional website and linkedin account. He also authored a piece for Popular Mechanics in 2010 defending thimerosal, titled “The Truth About 9 Anti-Vaccine Studies.” In it, he quoted millionaire vaccine industrialist Paul Offit as summarizing Dr. Mark Geier’s research on thimerosal and autism “junk.” Hadhazy also called Dr. Andrew Wakefield “discredited” and wrote that his 1998 Lancet paper on children with autism and bowel disease “largely launched the dangerous anti-vaccination movement.”

Adam Hadhazy further cited the letter former CDC researcher  Thomas Verstraeten wrote to Pediatrics falsely stating that CDC did not conceal any evidence  thimerosal causes autism. Citing Paul Offit, Hadhazy suggested that infants can “conservatively handle thousands of vaccines simultaneously”. The take-away point from all this is that Hadhazy is an all-purpose defender of the vaccine program, and he’s written Kennedy’s book for him. Hadhazy’s “substantive, behind the scenes role” in Kennedy striking the chapters connecting thimerosal to autism is more than evident.

In the Washington Post, Dr. Mark Hyman – celebrity doctor who wrote the book’s preface – takes credit for convincing Kennedy to remove the chapters. Yet Dr. Hyman is an awfully strange person to have done so, given that he has no history of writing about thimerosal. Dr. Hyman further echos a familiar pharma talking point: “Yes, there’s been an increase in autism, even as we take out thimerosal” (Ironically, the CDC data Dr. Hyman relied on to defend thimerosal is not even considered reliable by thimerosal defenders). Hadhazy’s piece for Popular Mechanics on thimerosal and vaccines is heavily laden with pharma talking points.

In Kennedy’s officially released book, the entire part on autism is removed including a chapter titled “Autism Rates Decline When Thimerosal Exposure Levels Are Reduced” and another on the government’s concession that vaccines caused autism in Hannah Poling. The entire part critiquing media coverage was removed as well. Even chapters in remaining parts were pulled. Those include chapters on CDC and AAP’s conflicts of interest, the Breusewitz v. Wyeth Supreme Court decision siding with drug companies, the Homeland Security Rider seeking to protect thimerosal maker Eli Lilly and CDC’s intimidation tactics against scientists such as Dr. Mark and David Geier and Prof. Richard Deth. Those chapters were apparently “too combustible” to keep as well, as was the word “Causative” that was taken out of the chapter title that formerly read “The Verstraeten Study – Causative Links between Thimerosal and Neurological Damage.”

Meanwhile, Age of Autism continues to ardently defend Kennedy, saying on its Facebook page: “If you’d like to piss in the cornflakes, find another bowl.”

It looks like Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has already done that to his own bowl.

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.