Tag Archives: Minnesota

Dr. Peter Hotez Hopes to Mandate Vaccines by Importing Measles

Despite pushing for mandatory vaccinations, Baylor College vaccine developer Dr. Peter Hotez vocally opposed President Trump’s travel ban on multiple measles-endemic countries.

Last January, Hotez told Nature News:

“Scientific communities across the world need collaborators in these countries who can combat epidemics before they arrive in the US,” 

Never mind that the ban applies to citizens of those countries coming here, not US citizens going there. Nothing about Hotez’s statement suggests any priority given to preventing epidemics from arriving to the US. How can the US count on failed states like Somalia to prevent its people from bringing measles here without placing any restrictions on who comes here?

The ongoing measles outbreak among Somalis in Minnesota started when the ban on Somalian travelers was being stalled by activist judges. Now the travel ban on Somalia and other measles-endemic countries is finally allowed to go into effect (for now). That may hamper the virus’ ability to travel from Africa directly to the US.

It is less likely, however, to prevent the virus from spreading to the US through Europe like it did to California at the beginning of the migrant crisis. Yet European countries continue to open their borders to infectious migrants while stripping citizens of vaccine exemption rights.

Undoubtedly, people like Hotez want that repeated here. The Texas politicians who voted for a failed, privacy-invading bill that would publicize immunization rates in schools also overwhelmingly support sanctuary cities. Houston – whose mayor personally intervened to censor Vaxxed – is one of those cities.

If school vaccine coverage rates are published, why not also publish a percentage breakdown of each school’s population by national origin? That may be a better indicator of a school’s likelihood of having an imported measles outbreak. Nobody has to be identified either, but the vaccine industry would never push for that.

And why would they? If measles is stopped from entering the US through common sense immigration policy, that would kill the vaccine industry’s ability to challenge vaccine exemptions through mandatory vaccination. As Hotez told that crooked Vice reporter, he hopes measles gets brought to Texas so that legislators will be more likely to mandate vaccines:

“The only thing that’s going to stop this runaway train right now is a large measles outbreak,” 

That runaway train Hotez is referring to is not the measles itself, it’s exemptions from the vaccines that damage children’s brains. Hotez has a daughter with autism, so no prizes for guessing why he really wants vaccine mandates. His persistent anger at anti-vaccinationists is fueled by his denial that his daughter’s autism could have been vaccine-caused. The more likely measles gets imported, the more likely he can take that anger out on anti-vaccinationists by punishing us with vaccine mandates.

Now it all makes sense why he opposed the president’s travel ban while living in a sanctuary city for illegal immigrants. He wants to spread a measles epidemic to the US!

ALL MMR VAX BACKERS CAUSE AUTISM AND MEASLES


There is no available measles vaccine, only the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine. The former prevents measles, the latter causes measles to linger in the guts of children who developed autism and GI disease as a result of MMR. Measles has made a comeback in the US and UK because there is no measles vaccine available – just the MMR which every child should be protected from. Below is a nearly 20-year old story about the withdrawal of the measles vaccine in the UK by the manufacturer because of – get this – high demand for its use. That demand followed publication of exonerated Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s paper on MMR-injured children. Former CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden is complicit in covering up their injuries.

Measles jab withdrawn due to ‘high demand’

PARENTS CONCERNED about inoculating their children with the controversial triple vaccine MMR will be forced to travel to Europe if they want a single measles vaccination, it was revealed yesterday.

The company that makes the single measles vaccine said it was withdrawing it from sale in Britain because it could not meet demand.

From now on parents will have only the option of using MMR, which has been linked by one study, published in the medical journal The Lancet, to autism and bowel disease.

Last night Pasteur Merieux MSD, the Paris-based company that makes both the triple and single vaccines, said the single vaccine had been available in Britain on a named-patient basis only.

“That meant it was only available to a very small number of people,” said Dr Veronique Maguin, the company’s marketing director.

“As demand grew we had to make an ethical decision about who the drug should be available to. It was a problem for the company because we could not satisfy everybody. Our main concern is one of public health and we felt we could not satisfy everybody.”

There has been a huge increase in demand for the single measles injection since the report last February in The Lancet on MMR, which also inoculates against mumps and rubella.

While a subsequent report published by the Medical Research Council found no evidence of the link, many parents remain suspicious of the triple vaccine and want to see more research carried out into its possible side- effects.

Some believe that receiving all three vaccines at once has a negative effect on the immune system.

Ann Coote, a founder member of the pressure group Jabs – Justice, Awareness, and Basic Support – said she was astounded the company was withdrawing the single vaccine.

“It does seem very strange. Most manufacturers faced with a demand for something would be rubbing their hands together,” she said.

“We get a lot of calls from parents who have lost faith in MMR and would prefer to have the option of a single vaccine. We would like to see MMR suspended and more research done.

“In the meantime single vaccines should be available. We are not against vaccines, we are against damage. Parents have a right to make a choice.”

Mrs Coote said many parents were considering travelling to Europe to purchase single jabs.

She said that her own daughter, Rachal, stopped breathing after being injected with the triple vaccine at the age of 18 months.

Now aged 11, Rachal still suffers from epileptic fits and has the mental age of a six-year-old.

Her daughter’s experience led Mrs Coote to set up Jabs, which has 1,700 members.

The Department of Health accepts the vaccine is not risk-free. “All drugs have side-effects,” said a spokeswoman. “We believe that there is more risk from not having the vaccination.”

She said the Government recommended having all three vaccinations at once, though she denied there had been any pressure placed on Pasteur Merieux MSD to withdraw the single vaccine.

“There is a risk to other children if a child is waiting to go back to the doctor for another vaccination. It is also more painful for the child,” she said.

“But the decision to withdraw the single vaccine is the company’s alone.”

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