Tag Archives: Mother 11

Autism Researcher Asked To Reject Demirjian Blood Money

Dr. Sudhir Gupta, University of California-Irvine

Below is a letter from Autism Investigated’s editor to immunology professor and researcher Dr. Sudhir Gupta. Dr. Gupta first proposed intravenous immunoglobulins for autism. He is also the recipient of an unrestricted research grant from Lancet Parents Richard and Aida Demirjian. Autism Investigated does not want to shut down research, but does want to get the Demirjians out of anything having to do with biomedical research. Demirjian made a false accusation of fraud against the Lancet paper.

Dear Dr. Gupta,

I am writing to urge you to please stop accepting money from Richard and Aida Demirjian, who are parents of one of the children in the retracted Lancet paper. Richard Demirjian has libeled Dr. Andrew Wakefield in the British Medical Journal. Mr. Demirjian admits that the British Medical Journal falsely stated his autistic symptoms began before vaccination, but does not demand a retraction of this claim. Even worse, he defamed Dr. Wakefield by claiming that the paper falsely stated his son’s autistic symptoms began a week after vaccination. It does not, it only says that his son developed an infection after vaccination which was accurate. Mr. Demirjian refuses to take back that statement.

Because of his willingness to throw autism researchers under the bus, the Demirjians’ grant money should not be accepted by any self-respecting autism researcher. The vaccine people want to shut down all immune-related autism research. When they come for you, Mr. Demirjian will have no problem throwing you under the bus as well. So please reject any further funding from the Demirjians.

Sincerely,

Jake Crosby, MPH

Here is what the paper actually says below:

The paper says pneumonia, not autism. Demirjian is a liar, and no autism researcher should accept his money.

Contact Lancet Family 11: Richard, Aida and Vahe Demirjian

The summary of each key member of the Demirjian family is as below.

Richard Demirjian, father 11, lives at 11 Canyon Terrace, Newport Coast, CA below. Call him to share your the story about your child and urge him to take back his false accusation that The Lancet paper is fraud. His number is 949 718 0180.

Aida Demirjian (photo credit: Palisades Tennis Club of Newport Beach), child 11’s mother, apparently escaped the notorious serial killer nicknamed the “Bedroom Basher.” Could this explain why Richard Demirjian (call at 949 718 0180 to share your story, but be civil) was paranoid enough to believe Dr. Andrew Wakefield fabricated his son’s records despite also believing his son is vaccine-injured? Read PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA vs. GERALD PARKER (a.k.a. the Bedroom Basher). His death sentence was just upheld by the California Supreme Court.

Vahe Demirjian (photo from Facebook profile) is child 11 in The Lancet paper, son of Richard and Aida Demirjian. It is Vahe’s case that was allegedly fabricated, but it wasn’t. Despite Richard Demirjian’s claim that the paper reported Vahe’s autistic symptoms as beginning one week after the vaccine, the paper describes the first symptoms associated with exposure as “viral pneumonia.”

Vahe Demirjian can be reached at vahedemirjian@cox.net. He is an adult and knows how his medical records were used for lies. Please contact him too.

Did Brush With Serial Killer Plant Demirjian Paranoia?

Aida Demirjian (photo credit: Palisades Tennis Club of Newport Beach), child 11’s mother, apparently escaped the notorious serial killer nicknamed the “Bedroom Basher.” Could this explain why Richard Demirjian (call at 949 718 0180 to share your story, but be civil) was paranoid enough to believe Dr. Andrew Wakefield fabricated his son’s records despite also believing his son is vaccine-injured? From PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA vs. GERALD PARKER (a.k.a. the Bedroom Basher):

Aida Demirjian 
On February 2, 1980, Aida Demirjian lived in an apartment at 1033
East Cordova Street in Pasadena. She arrived home around 10:OO that night
and parked in the complex’s underground parking structure. As she was
getting out of her car and locking the door, a black man hit her two or three
times with an iron rod. She fell down and pretended to be unconscious,
hoping that he would just take her purse and leave, but he kept hitting her.
There was blood all over. She got up and started running and yelling for
help, but he ran after her and grabbed her and hit her again. She held up her
hands to defend herself and he hit her in the hand, breaking her thumb and
ring and middle fingers. He pulled her necklace off and drug her a couple
of yards. She pretended to be unconscious again as he stood at her feet
looking through her purse. When he lifted up her skirt, she got up and ran
to the first floor and banged on her manager’s door, asking for help. She
was hospitalized that night and had surgery to repair a skull fracture. Her
fingers were permanently injured; she cannot bend her middle finger at the
first joint and her ring finger is now shorter and crooked. (10 RT 2 1 12-
2 120.)
Donald Barra lived in an apartment across the street from
Demirjian’s complex. Shortly after 10:OO p.m. on February 2, 1980, he
went to investigate a “blood-curdling, moaning kind of scream.” He
determined that the noise was coming from a lower parking structure across
Cordova Street. He walked down into the parking structure but could not
see much because it was dark. He eventually saw a black man wearing a
light T-shirt and darker pants standing over a whimpering Demirjian with
some kind of a bludgeon in his hand. Barra yelled at the man to stop. He
stopped for a second and turned around and looked at Barra, then started to
“saunter” around. Barra told him again to stop where he was and the man
“took off like a rabbit” up the ramp and East on Cordova. Barra then turned
his attention to Demirjian. Her head was matted with blood and her right
hand was severely damaged. Her fingers had swelled so much they looked
like “ballpark franks.” She wore quite a few rings and the paramedics had
to cut them off to save her fingers. Later that evening police officers took
Barra to look at a person who was in custody. As far as his clothes and
general appearance, the person looked similar to the man Barra had seen
earlier that day. (10 RT 2 120-2 124.)
Pasadena police officer Dennis McQueeny was dispatched around
10:20 p.m. to respond to the scene. He noticed appellant when he was
about a half-block from the apartment complex. The knees of appellant’s
pants were scuffed, and they appeared to be stained. McQueeny stopped
and confronted appellant and saw that he had blood on his pants, shirt, and
hands. Appellant gave McQueeny identification indicating he was a staff
sergeant in the Marine Corps. McQueeny kept appellant at the location
until Barra came by, then took him into custody. According to McQueeny,
appellant was calm, cooperative, and compliant. They had no trouble
communicating. He did not see any evidence of intoxication. (1 0 RT 2 124-
2 130.) Another officer found a metal pipe, approximately eight inches long
and three inches in diameter, near one of three puddles of blood on the floor
of the parking structure. It had what appeared to be blood on it. He found a
gold and pearl necklace three parking spaces away from the metal pipe. (10
RT 227 1 .)
Exhibit 122 (10 CT 3 176-3 189) was introduced as evidence. Along
with fingerprints and photographs from the Department of Corrections, it
included a certified copy of appellant’s conviction in Los Angeles County
for robbery. (10 CT 3 180; 10 RT 2170,2254.)

On June 5, 2017, the California Supreme Court upheld Gerald Parker’s death sentence.