Tag Archives: Ny Times

Oppose Vaccination Entirely Since Proponents Call for Cover-up

iansvoice.org

Hear it from the very words of the vaccine people/medical establishment on what to do with evidence of their product’s assault on kids:

Lancet editor on not publishing vaccine injuries on pretense that they’re by expert witnesses in litigation, 2004:

“But had we known about the conflict of interest, with hindsight, we would have asked for this to be omitted.”

Complaint against Lancet authors to UK’s General Medical Council, demanding it single out the lead author for criticizing a vaccine:

I submit that on a matter as serious as the safety of a vaccine, touching on the health of millions of children, and affecting parental decisions of the utmost seriousness, Mr Wakefield was under an absolute duty to make the true position clear, with regard to both his involvement in the litigation and the litigant status of children upon whom he purported to derive findings.

General Medical Council’s 2010 “findings” against Lancet paper authors, based on 2005 charges:

You knew or ought to have known that your reporting in the Lancet paper of a temporal link between the syndrome you described and the MMR vaccination, Admitted and found proved i. had major public health implications, Admitted and found proved ii. would attract intense public and media interest, Admitted and found proved

Paul Offit in NY Times, 2018:

Dr. Offit says that researchers should handle findings differently when there’s a chance they might frighten the public. He thinks that small, inconclusive, worrying studies should not be published because they could do more harm than good.

That same article (boldface mine):

This is not to say that anyone is covering up major safety problems, by the way…

There’s no question that bad vaccine science does not deserve a forum — and much of the research cited by anti-vaccine activists is very bad indeed.

WHO adviser John Clements on thimerosal (Simpsonwood, 2000):

“perhaps this study should not have been done at all…the research results have to be handled”

David Gorski, a.k.a. “Orac” agreeing with Clements’ keeping results out of the hands of lawyers for vaccine injured children, 2005:

Dr. Clements was just expressing a quite reasonable fear that lawyers will use very preliminary and unconfirmed studies for their own ends, which is what they do indeed routinely do. Such a concern was not at all unreasonable and is still not unreasonable.

Forbes 2015 headline:

Anti-Vaccine Doctors Should Lose Their Licenses 

And just look at this internal pharma company memo from 1979:

After the reporting of the SID cases in Tennessee, we discussed the merits of limiting distribution of a large number of vials from a single lot to a single state, county or city health department and obtained agreement from the senior management staff to proceed with such a plan. 

What did they get in exchange for murdering infants? Total immunity from litigation!

Should we support any vaccines when their proponents continue to openly censor evidence that they assault and murder kids? Or should we oppose vaccination entirely?

Autism Investigated is going with the latter.

Teenage Science Fraudster Is Released on Parole After Showing Remorse

This post is a satirical update from a previous post of Autism Investigated’s two years ago, which was also a satire. The above photo and below quotes of Marco “Arturo” Zozaya are actually from a recent (fake news) New York Times article about him, where he admits his video denying vaccine injury was “quite rude.” The hyperlinks below go to actual stories of fraud by vaccine officials. 

“I look back on it and see that I was actually quite rude,” Mr. Zozaya, now 14, told the parole board about when he refused to show remorse upon his 2016 conviction.

Initially sentenced to 12 years of hard time, Zozaya was released on parole after serving two years. His convictions included embezzlement of federal grants and destruction of evidence that vaccines cause autism.

Convicted at 12, he was expected to serve prison time until the age of 24. That would have put him away for half his life. However, his age, good behavior and subsequent remorse for what he had done were all factors.

The fact that he was on the autism spectrum himself also helped. Zozaya spent most of his time in his cell just keeping to himself.

“He didn’t give us any trouble,” a corrections officer who wished not to be named told Autism Investigated.

“I was really disappointed,” Zozaya told the parole board of he and his co-conspirators’ actions to junk research and intimidate scientists. “I wish honestly that people were as much into science as they are into shutting people down.”