Tag Archives: Potus

CDC Director Tweets Vaccine Indoctrination Video

Brenda Fitzgerald has just tweeted an indoctrination video about how great Rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines are, proclaiming vaccines one of the greatest achievements of the last decade. Meanwhile, vaccines were giving countless American children autism that entire time.

What did President Trump expect when he let such a person take that position? He campaigned on a platform of vaccine safety, which would require the CDC to stop lying about poisoning children. Yet he appointed exactly the wrong person for the job.

Has President Trump backed down from his promise to put together a vaccine safety commission, even though he insisted he wouldn’t? If he hasn’t, how will such a commission function with someone like Fitzgerald running CDC? She has nothing to lose from undermining such a commission. If Trump gets voted out and she gets replaced, she’ll just get her cozy job at pharma four years sooner.

A federal agency may work more efficiently if it’s run by someone who thinks like her subordinates, but in this case it’s efficiency for an evil purpose. The people working under Fitzgerald who are part of the problem should not be at CDC either. They belong at pharmaceutical companies, at best.

Dr. Peter Hotez Hopes to Mandate Vaccines by Importing Measles

Despite pushing for mandatory vaccinations, Baylor College vaccine developer Dr. Peter Hotez vocally opposed President Trump’s travel ban on multiple measles-endemic countries.

Last January, Hotez told Nature News:

“Scientific communities across the world need collaborators in these countries who can combat epidemics before they arrive in the US,” 

Never mind that the ban applies to citizens of those countries coming here, not US citizens going there. Nothing about Hotez’s statement suggests any priority given to preventing epidemics from arriving to the US. How can the US count on failed states like Somalia to prevent its people from bringing measles here without placing any restrictions on who comes here?

The ongoing measles outbreak among Somalis in Minnesota started when the ban on Somalian travelers was being stalled by activist judges. Now the travel ban on Somalia and other measles-endemic countries is finally allowed to go into effect (for now). That may hamper the virus’ ability to travel from Africa directly to the US.

It is less likely, however, to prevent the virus from spreading to the US through Europe like it did to California at the beginning of the migrant crisis. Yet European countries continue to open their borders to infectious migrants while stripping citizens of vaccine exemption rights.

Undoubtedly, people like Hotez want that repeated here. The Texas politicians who voted for a failed, privacy-invading bill that would publicize immunization rates in schools also overwhelmingly support sanctuary cities. Houston – whose mayor personally intervened to censor Vaxxed – is one of those cities.

If school vaccine coverage rates are published, why not also publish a percentage breakdown of each school’s population by national origin? That may be a better indicator of a school’s likelihood of having an imported measles outbreak. Nobody has to be identified either, but the vaccine industry would never push for that.

And why would they? If measles is stopped from entering the US through common sense immigration policy, that would kill the vaccine industry’s ability to challenge vaccine exemptions through mandatory vaccination. As Hotez told that crooked Vice reporter, he hopes measles gets brought to Texas so that legislators will be more likely to mandate vaccines:

“The only thing that’s going to stop this runaway train right now is a large measles outbreak,” 

That runaway train Hotez is referring to is not the measles itself, it’s exemptions from the vaccines that damage children’s brains. Hotez has a daughter with autism, so no prizes for guessing why he really wants vaccine mandates. His persistent anger at anti-vaccinationists is fueled by his denial that his daughter’s autism could have been vaccine-caused. The more likely measles gets imported, the more likely he can take that anger out on anti-vaccinationists by punishing us with vaccine mandates.

Now it all makes sense why he opposed the president’s travel ban while living in a sanctuary city for illegal immigrants. He wants to spread a measles epidemic to the US!

Ask CDC Director If She Agrees With Gagging Dr. William Thompson!

It’s finally happened! More than a week into her new job as CDC Director, Brenda Fitzgerald has produced her first tweet!

Yes, Dr. Fitzgerald. Actually, there is some info you can share with us. Three weeks before the election, your predecessor blocked CDC whistleblower Dr. William Thompson from testifying in a deposition. Then-CDC director Thomas Frieden’s exact words were as follows:

“Dr. William Thompson’s deposition testimony would not substantially promote the objectives of CDC or HHS.”

Do you agree with that statement, Dr. Fitzgerald? If nothing was covered up, then surely his testimony wouldn’t be a problem for you. If something was covered up, doesn’t the public deserve to know what went on in your agency 15 years ago? Especially if it has major implications for the health of children?

Shortly before your 2014 pro-vaccine op-ed, the since-elected president said this:

Then later that year, what do you know? CDC “research” concerning a one-time, massive shot known as the MMR turned out to be the result of misconduct, according to one of your own employees. Trump called it like it is:

As you probably know, President Trump spoke out on vaccine dangers in the second GOP debate. As president-elect, he wanted to establish a vaccine safety commission which Newt Gingrich supported. Did he really say all that only to appoint another stooge who would cover up the evidence again?

Wall Street Journal: CDC Director Says She Is A “Strong Advocate for Vaccines”

New CDC Chief Lays Out Priorities as Agency Faces Cuts

 
Brenda Fitzgerald, the new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said she will prioritize a wide range of public health issues, from fighting infectious disease to strengthening early-childhood development.


By Betsy McKay

The new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said she will prioritize a wide range of public health issues, from fighting infectious disease to strengthening early-childhood development, as the federal agency faces potentially substantial budget cuts.

In an interview at the end of her first week on the job, Brenda Fitzgerald said she would make a strong case for public health spending should the agency fall on tough times.

“When there are austere times, the most important factor is that you have to know what your mission is,” Dr. Fitzgerald said. “You make sure what you’re doing is indeed fulfilling that role, because there are certain things that I believe only public health can do,” she said.

The Trump administration has proposed a $1.22 billion, or 17%, cut to the CDC’s budget for fiscal 2018, including reductions in chronic disease prevention and epidemic preparedness.

Many public health experts welcomed Dr. Fitzgerald’s July 7 appointment, because she is a public health advocate and leader. But she has been criticized for a Georgia childhood obesity program that accepted funds from Coca-Cola Co.’s foundation and for offering controversial anti-aging remedies as a practicing obstetrician-gynecologist.

Dr. Fitzgerald, 71 years old, grew up in Middlesboro, Ky., a town in coal-mining country. She “met this cute boy in medical school” at Emory University and has been in Georgia ever since, practicing as an OB-GYN for three decades, raising a daughter and son, and serving state Republican leaders. She was Georgia’s public health commissioner from 2011 until she was named to her CDC post.

Brenda Fitzgerald said she would make a strong case for public health spending should the agency fall on tough times.Photo: Melissa Golden for The Wall Street Journal

She said she is commuting to her new job from her home in Carrollton, Ga., nearly 60 miles west of Atlanta because “that cute boy I married—he grew up there. He’s not moving.”

She calls herself a “strong advocate for vaccines” and says she supports making reliable contraception available, two issues that have been scrutinized by the new administration.

Rates of premature births can be brought down by spacing births, saving on health-care costs, she said, an approach that generally requires contraception. Caring for a premature infant in the first year, of life costs about 10 times as much as caring for a healthy, full-term baby, making it one of the most expensive health-care needs, and that added costs extend well beyond the first year. “It’s huge,” she said.

She believes decisions about abortion should be made “between a woman and her doctor,” with limitations. “There’s absolutely no case once a child is viable,” she said. But, she added, “I did not do abortions in my practice.”

The CDC collects data on abortions but doesn’t fund them.

Dr. Fitzgerald said that preventing the spread of infectious disease will remain a priority for the agency. “Quite frankly, it’s our responsibility,” she said.

That includes doing more to prevent antibiotic resistance, tracking emerging infections overseas and helping other countries build their infectious-disease-fighting capacities, she said.

Battling the U.S.’s biggest killers will also be a focus for the CDC under her leadership, she said, though she didn’t cite specifics. Fighting opioid addiction—which killed more than 33,000 people in the U.S. in 2015—is a priority for the administration, her spokeswoman said.

She said she also wants to make advances in an area she championed as Georgia’s public health commissioner: children’s early brain development. “If we can change something at the very beginning that is a simple intervention like language development, that’s a phenomenal chance to influence that child’s entire life,” she said.

Dr. Fitzgerald has come under fire for the Georgia SHAPE childhood obesity program, which took $1 million from 2013 to 2015 from the Coca-Cola Foundation to promote physical activity.

She said that the state purposely sought partners from every sector, including large area employers such as Coca-Cola, to join its $57 million program. The program promotes eating fresh fruits and vegetables in addition to physical activity, she said.

“I think if you’re going to solve a big problem, you’ve got to have a public-private partnership,” she said. “What you have to do is start at that place on which there is agreement and work from there.”

As a practicing OB-GYN, Dr. Fitzgerald said she took continuing education courses to become a fellow in anti-aging medicine after getting many questions from menopausal patients. Such therapies include bioidentical hormones, which are identical in molecular structure to the hormones women make in their bodies.

They are often marketed as a safer alternative to traditional hormone replacement therapy, but have skeptics because they haven’t been well studied. The Food and Drug Administration says it doesn’t have evidence that bioidentical hormones are safer or more effective than other hormone products.

“One, I was curious, two, I wanted to see what the scientific data was there,” she said. “I wanted to be able to answer patients’ questions.”

She said she believes there is more research to be done on the therapies. She said she closed her OB-GYN practice when she became public health commissioner in Georgia, and “I will not be practicing private medicine here at CDC.”

Write to Betsy McKay at betsy.mckay@wsj.com

Originally published in The Wall Street Journalavailable without subscription here.

Vice Reporter Blows Off Autism Investigated and Does One-Sided Hit-Piece

Arielle Duhaime-Ross, Vice News Tonight Reporter

After President Trump’s election, Autism Investigated got a little message from Vice News Tonight‘s Arielle Duhaime-Ross. She is a Canadian science reporter whose most notable story has been her smears of an astrophysicist for his “sexist” shirt.

After Duhaime-Ross requested to contact Autism Investigated and speak on the phone “informally”, Autism Investigated responded by requesting permission to tape-record the conversation. She agreed and even said she would tape-record too…only to never call as she said she would.

Then just this week, she produced a craptacular piece of “journalism” that is the perfect combination of left-wing, anti-Texas snobbery and vaccine-shilling propaganda. Way to lie to sources and blow them off, Arielle!

See our below exchange:

Hello Mr Crosby, 

I’m a correspondent for VICE News Tonight, a nightly news show that airs on HBO. As I’m sure you know, President-elect Donald Trump has expressed his support of the anti-vaccine movement in a series of tweets. Given that he’s now been elected, I’m curious if organizations or groups who oppose strict vaccine schedules for children or who oppose vaccines altogether are doing anything to prepare for his tenure as President. If you have some time, I’d like to chat with you on the phone, informally. Let me know if that works for you. Thank you.
11/22/2016 1:10AM

Autism Investigated
Hi, thank you for writing. I am willing to talk to you and plan on tape-recording our exchange. Look forward to talking. -Jake
Number is [REDACTED]. What day/time do you plan on calling?
11/22/2016 10:08AM

Arielle Duhaime-Ross
That’s fine. I’ll record the exchange as well if that’s alright with you. What time would you like to chat? And do you have an email address I can use to reach you?
11/22/2016 12:43PM

Autism Investigated
Not a problem. I could do before 5 today or after 2 tomorrow. You can reach me through the AI address: info@autisminvestigated.com

Arielle Duhaime-Ross
Thanks for sending me your email! Something has come up at work and I won’t be able to chat with you for a while. May I contact you again in the future when my schedule frees up?
It might be a while.

Autism Investigated
Sure, no worries.
Seen by Arielle Duhaime-Ross at November 22, 2016 1:30 pm

Arielle Duhaime-Ross
Thank you.

FIVE MONTHS LATER

APR 11TH, 12:55AM
Autism Investigated
Whatever happened to our phone call?

No response. She must’ve backed down when she realized she just lost her opportunity to quote-mine and misrepresent Autism Investigated.

It’s probably for the best that she never called. Just look at what this “science” reporter thinks of the biology of gender, for example:

 

 

Do Not Tap Brenda Fitzgerald to Run CDC, President Trump!

Below is an open letter from the editor to President Trump urging him to rescind any consideration to appointing Georgia health commissioner Brenda Fitzgerald to CDC director.

Dear President Trump,

I was a huge supporter of you since before the primary contests. I supported you because you were miles ahead of all the other candidates in supporting vaccine safety.

So I was very disappointed to read the following from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

President Donald Trump is expected to tap the head of the Georgia Department of Public Health as the new director of the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to two administration sources.

This is unacceptable. That same person, Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, wrote in that same paper three years ago this:

I’ve heard all the arguments against vaccination. All have been debunked, including the infamous 1980s study in Europe about a similar vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella, and a supposed link – that we now know to be false – to autism, which shattered vaccine use in Europe. 

The lead author of that “infamous” study is who you met with last summer, Dr. Andrew Wakefield. Even the journal that retracted his paper know their basis for doing so is false.

If you want a genuine vaccine safety commission as you promised Robert F. Kennedy Jr., it will not work with federal agency heads all wanting to keep the status quo. You have already appointed someone to run the FDA who has testified that he will challenge you on vaccine safety. There was no major outcry then because, unlike CDC, FDA does not dictate federal vaccine policy.

The CDC policies, by contrast, influence mandatory state vaccination policies throughout the entire country. Its chief responsibilities include the conflicting positions of safety regulation and routine promotion. A senior scientist from the CDC has since come forward with allegations that he and his colleagues manipulated and hid research results. At the time, you tweeted:

Shortly before the election, the previous CDC director blocked the whistleblower who you said was proving you right about vaccines from testifying under oath in a deposition. Yet every indication suggests that the person you are reportedly considering for the role would do the same.

I understand the temptation to appoint establishment-friendly people as you seek Senate support to repeal Obamacare. But like Obamacare, the autism epidemic has also heaped tremendous healthcare costs on the American people. We will not eliminate the rising costs of Obamacare by accepting the rising cost of autism.

In a meeting you held with advocates, you were told that you were the only one who can fix the autism epidemic. You replied that you will. You also said in front of 23 million viewers that you would push for safer vaccinations and that you believed doing so would have a major impact on autism. Many people voted for you this past election because of that.

Now is your chance to fulfill your campaign promises. We appreciate that you have not backed down over your desire to put together a vaccine safety commission. Such a commission can only be effective, however, with federal health agency chiefs open to its policies. FDA commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb is already not open and neither would Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald be should you appoint her CDC director. Please withdraw any consideration of Dr. Fitzgerald. That way, we can truly end the autism epidemic and Make America Great Again!

Your supporter,

Jake Crosby, MPH

John Oliver Proves He Knows Vaccine Injury Like He Does Islamic Terrorism

John Oliver

John Oliver with scene from Bataclan Theatre massacre by ISIS terrorists in Paris, November 13th, 2015

There is nothing more damning of John Oliver than the words of John Oliver. All of the following are from his June 25th episode of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.

On President Trump’s decision to space out vaccinations:

…it’s the middle ground between sense and nonsense. It’s like saying, ‘It would be crazy to eat that entire bar of soap, so I’ll just eat half of it.’

On exonerated British doctor Andrew Wakefield:

He’s basically the Lance Armstrong of doctors.

On mercury in flu shots still given to pregnant mothers:

So we essentially spent time and energy solving a problem that never existed. It’s like spending years fighting to get marshmallows out of Lucky Charms because a few people think minions can choke to death on them. 

On retired Congressman Dan Burton’s issue with lack of safety studies:

Proving a negative is an impossible standard. And that is also a slippery slope, because it means that I can say to youYouDan Burton, are a DONKEY FUCKER!’

Yet knowingly proving a negative to prove there is no conspiracy to cover up vaccine harms, falsely claiming:

On those rare occasions when there have been issues with vaccines, they’ve been pulled and fast. And I know that that explanation will still not satisfy some.

Finally, and worst of all, on his own infant son born premature:

We are vaccinating him fully, on schedule. And if I can overcome the temptation to listen to the irrational shouting of my terrified lizard brain, then I believe that everyone can.

Captain Picard facepalm

 

Alison Singer: Autism Parents’ Jewish Ghetto Police

Fake autism charity/pharma front group founder Alison Singer has just made an appearance on Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (who famously said that America does not want Donald Trump to be president). So Autism Investigated has decided to re-run this 2011 Age of Autism post about her by the Deplorable Autist himself. It includes updated links to the vaccine-autism link science she denies exists, the truth behind her “foundation”, and the fact that she prevented autism in her younger child by spacing out of vaccines. In other words, she knows what caused her older daughter’s autism yet collaborates with the pharmaceutical industry to help it injure and kill more children for profit.

Alison Singer: Autism Mom, Pharma Wife

By Jake Crosby

Alison Singer: autism parent, IACC seat usurper, industry front group founder, recent guest on The Dr. Oz Show, and now – loyal Pharma-funded wife. Of course, that’s what she’s always been. We just didn’t know it, until now.

Mrs. Singer is married to Dan Singer, a longtime employee of McKinsey and Company: a global management consulting firm. Singer’s firm sponsors one of the awards given out by the British Medical Journal, which published and even endorsed British Pharmaceutical Industry sock puppet Brian Deer’s false allegations of fraud against Dr. Andrew Wakefield. McKinsey is not Pharma, you might say. True to an extent, but McKinsey’s commitment to the industry is significant. In the “industry practices” category of “client service,” McKinsey and Co. has a whole page on “Pharmaceuticals & Medical Products,” where they offer a wide range of consultation services to the pharmaceutical industry on everything from prescription pharmaceuticals, to over the counter medicines, to biotechnology and medical products and diagnostics. In 2006, in the company’s quarterly, an article was even run entitled “Avian flu: Expanding global vaccine production.” The avian flu vaccine is preserved in 49 micrograms of mercury, approximately twice that of a season flu shot.

But on January 12 McKinsey did more than consult for the pharmaceutical industry; they partied with its leading vaccine spokesman, millionaire vaccine industrialist Dr. Paul Offit. An email invitation sent out by Alison Singer’s group, the Autism Science Foundation, read:

“Please join us for the book launch and signing

at the offices of McKinsey & Company


55 East 52nd Street, 21st floor


New York, NY 10022


Wednesday, January 12, 2011
6P-8P

Hosted by: Autism Science Foundation

RSVP: Julie Martin
Tel. 646-723-3977

Underneath that message is a bio of Paul Offit and next to it is a picture of Offit’s book cover. Below the book cover, it says:

“All proceeds from sales of Deadly Choices will be donated to the Autism Science Foundation”

It’s more than a little odd that McKinsey would be promoting the work of the Autism Science Foundation (ASF). Ever sensitive to the prestige and standing of its partners, McKinsey would seem a more natural partner of Autism Speaks, the Park Avenue charity of the autism world rather than an upstart run out of Singer’s garage (actually, ASF rents Singer a desk and receptionist from a “Sunshine Suites” property in Noho). Understanding their ASF promotion requires understanding McKinsey’s longstanding role in the autism-vaccine controversies.

And McKinsey partners have been closely connected to the debate, up to the highest levels of the firm. Up until recently, McKinsey was headed by Ian Davis, younger brother of GlaxoSmithKline board of directors member Sir Crispin Davis, and twin brother of Sir Nigel Davis – the judge who denied appeals from MMR litigation claimants to have their legal aid continued.

Though Ian Davis would eventually step down from his position at McKinsey in 2009, it was not before Alison Singer resigned from Autism Speaks. Her resignation was prompted by the charity rightfully condemning the IACC’s backhanded removal of research into some pharmacologic etiologies of autism from its mission. Mrs. Singer’s justification was that there are limited funds for autism research that could be better spent, even though Singer supports such funding being dumped into the money pit of genetic research, and even though not only pharmacologic, but environmental factors overall, have been horribly understudied by comparison.

So she founded a front group posing as an autism charity – the Autism Science Foundation – with millionaire pharmaceutical industrialist Dr. Paul Offit. ASF is the only autism research organization founded on the basis of the science it won’t pursue (it’s been “asked and answered, vaccines don’t cause autism”) than that it will do. And despite the fact that she was originally appointed to a public seat on the IACC as an Autism Speaks representative, she was allowed to keep her position as representative of her own corporate fringe offshoot, effectively usurping Autism Speaks’ representation on the committee.

During the time Singer resigned from Autism Speaks and began her front group, Ian Davis was still head of the company where her husband continues to work. Here’s a brief sequence of events. For more than 20 years, Dan Singer has been a loyal employee of McKinsey, joining the company out of Harvard Business School in 1989 and climbing the ladder until being promoted to director in 1994. That same year, he married his Harvard and Yale sweetheart, Alison Tepper, now Alison Tepper-Singer, whom we all know as Alison Singer. She would take up a job at NBC later that year and the couple would have a daughter together.

Then in 1999, Singer quit her job as a vice president of the network when that daughter was diagnosed with autism. She recently told CNN about her decision about giving MMR to her next child:

“I split the vaccine for my second daughter.”

Her second daughter now remains neurotypical. And the choice to vaccinate against measles, mumps and rubella separately seems not to have harmed Singer’s second daughter in any way. So Alison Singer not only followed Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s advice (and conceivably is benefiting from it), but was even an advocate for his cause in the popular press – at least in one instance.

When NBC ran an episode of “ER” in 2001 that featured a child who died of the measles presumably because he was not vaccinated with MMR, Singer reacted with outrage. According to The New York Daily News:

“Alison Tepper Singer, a former vice president in NBC’s desktop video division, faulted the “ER” episode for its “complete belittling of another viewpoint,” she told The News. Singer resigned from NBC in 1999 when her older daughter was diagnosed with autism.

“It was so irresponsible and so callous and so heartbreaking for parents who are dealing with this issue that I found it sad,” she said of the “ER” episode.”

Then in 2003, Ian Davis became McKinsey’s worldwide managing director. In other words, he became Dan Singer’s boss. Did this change of leadership bring a new kind of influence into the Singer household? Only the Singers know for sure. But one thing is clear, that Alison Singer, after previously splitting up the MMR for her younger, neurotypical daughter and speaking out against a biased TV show, began changing her public position about what she thought might cause autism.

Now, I already have a good idea what Alison Singer might say to all this, her reading of the “science” convinced her otherwise. In response to a January 14, 2010 article I wrote about Kevin Leitch speculating that guilt over giving his daughter a vaccine that triggered her autism drove him to finding solace in the neurodiversity movement, Singer wrote the following comment on the Leftbrain/Rightbrain blog:

What a strange story. Many parents question whether vaccines are involved in autism because of the media coverage of the issue, but then they read the science and realize the studies are there and the science clearly indicates no causal role for vaccines. Kev, although I find your point of view refreshing and your posts unique, I dare say you are hardly alone at coming to this conclusion. Jake will have to try harder next time.

 

What a strange position for her to take. Not only did she not read my article but there was already plenty of purported “research” in 2001 claiming to disprove a link between MMR and autism, virtually all of which was thrown out as useless junk science in an international review by the Cochrane Collaboration in 2005, which also conceded the evidence of the vaccine’s safety was “largely inadequate.” Many of those sorts of studies published since 2001, including the CDC’s own study, were actually positive findings reported as negative ones. Perhaps most disturbing of all was the confirmation of vaccine-strain measles virus in the terminal ileums and cerebrospinal fluid of children with autism and bowel disease in the O’Leary paper published in Molecular Pathology and the Bradstreet paper published in JPandS respectively (contrary to the propaganda machine, the later Hornig paper did not falsify these findings). Finally, one would think the HHS concessions of children like Bailey Banks and Hannah Poling who developed autism after their vaccines becoming public knowledge would have ended this debate altogether.

I don’t know what “science” Ms. Singer is referring to, but scientifically, consumers have far more reasons to fear vaccines and the MMR vaccine in particular in 2011 than they ever had back in 2001. Whatever motive the Singers’ would develop for no longer believing the MMR causes autism, it was certainly not scientific. If the twin brother of a person who denied justice to personal injury claimants and the younger brother of a man helping to facilitate a smear campaign against one of the claimants’ expert witnesses became my boss, I would not want to say anything potentially favorable about that witness for fear of jeopardizing my job. I certainly would not want my wife to do the same, either.

Alison Singer had a very different opinion by the time NBC President Bob Wright founded Autism Speaks along with his wife Suzanne compared to her opinion in the Daily News piece in 2001. Whatever changed Mrs. Singer’s mind about what causes autism, it likely happened within a time period no sooner than 2001 but probably no later than 2005 when she joined Autism Speaks. Ian Davis becoming head of McKinsey occurred right in the middle of that, also happening at around the same time his brother Crispin joined Glaxo’s board of directors. She has kept this connection between her husband’s company and the pharmaceutical industry to herself.

Alison Singer cannot honestly call her group an “autism charity” when its activities are focused on promoting and defending drugs (ie vaccines) for the pharmaceutical industry. She has actually traveled with Paul Offit to Atlanta to speak at an immunization conference on how to compel parents to vaccinate recklessly. Autism Science Foundation is a corporate front group with an agenda that predetermines its approach to autism. Its non-profit status should be revoked.

Originally published on Age of Autism

Autistic Obama Appointee Ari Ne’eman Plugs Violent, Far-Left Terror Group Antifa

Black Bloc Ari

Autistic presidential appointee Ari Ne’eman has given a plug to New York City Antifa on Twitter. Antifa (or “anti-fascist”) is a gang of masked extremists. They violently assault Trump supporters all over the country. Antifa shows up at events featuring speakers they don’t like and then “shuts them down” with mob violence. They justify doing so by claiming they are “shutting down fascism,” considering Trump a fascist. Ne’eman agrees.

The Evil Election 

Antifa succeeded in shutting down gay writer Milo Yiannopoulos at UC Berkeley. They attacked his fans and rioted out of control. Just recently, an Antifa member was arrested for the brutal assault of a Trump supporter with a bike lock at a free speech rally. None of these events were criticized by him. Yet he slammed the free and fair election of Trump.

If Trump’s election is “so profoundly evil and mendacious”, how evil and mendacious is it to Ne’eman to put on masks and attack people with opinions different from your own? Given that he just plugged Antifa on the premise of condemning terror, not so much.

FAKE NEWS: FOUR VACCINE LIES FROM SCIENCE MAGAZINE

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Science Magazine is fake science news and lies routinely about vaccine safety like the rest of the damn mainstream media and major science journals. Here’s four examples from their dishonest post “Four vaccine myths and where they come from” by one of their hired liars Lindzi Wessel. Autism Investigated will not refute all the lies because there are too many, just the major ones below.

“False: Vaccinations can cause autism”

Citing further concerns about ethics and misrepresentation, The Lancet retracted the paper in 2010. Shortly after, the United Kingdom’s General Medical Council permanently pulled Wakefield’s medical license.

The truth is, all those findings against Wakefield and his paper were completely overturned in a court decision that said the GMC used “faulty reasoning” and came to “wrong conclusion”(s). Even The Lancet acknowledges this.

[Brian] Hooker reanalyzed the data in 2014 and claimed CDC had hidden evidence that the vaccine could increase autism risk in black boys. In fact, CDC noted in the paper that rates of vaccination in the oldest age group were slightly higher in kids with autism.

Wait, what about for black kids? The CDC didn’t cover up effects for race because they reported effects for age? That’s a logical conclusion to draw, according to Science Magazine?

“False: Mercury in vaccines acts as a neurotoxin”

Science Magazine completely dismisses Kennedy’s damning Deadly Immunity article of mercury in childhood vaccinations. The excuse was the ghostwritten retraction by the pedophile-defending Salon.com site. Science never went into the details of the retraction because it would show it to be worthless.

Science Magazine continued:

In 2001, well before Kennedy’s article or his related book, thimerosal was removed from all childhood vaccines in the United States except multidose vials of flu vaccine.

What it left out was that in 2004 those flu vaccines were recommended for pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy, which has since been linked to autism. It then went on to characterize autism declining post-thimerosal removal in Denmark as a “misinterpretation of epidemiogical data.” Actually, it’s seen in a graph of epidemiological data:

“False: Mercury in vaccines acts as a neurotoxin”

Remarkably, this entire section didn’t focus on work of any other doctor or scientist. It was merely an attack on the physician-son team Dr. Mark and David Geier, taking as gospel smears from the Institute of Medicine and the Maryland Board of Physicians. The Institute of Medicine was revealed in Kennedy’s own article as coming to a foregone conclusion about thimerosal being safe, and being paid to do so. The Maryland Board of Physicians was successfully sued by the Geiers for intentionally violating their confidentiality. Dr. Geier has also responded to the allegations publicly.

Will Science condemn hormones and genital mutilation for “transgender” autists and acknowledge that there are only two genders? Doubtful.

“False: Spreading out vaccines can be safer for kids”

This section is entirely based on the talking points of millionaire vaccine industrialist Paul Offit. He is not only conflicted, but is also an unhinged maniac who said children can safely receive 10,000 vaccines at once. There is no comparison between a vaccine which contains loads of toxic ingredients injected directly into the body and antigens blocked by the human body’s natural defenses.

There is no room for the benefit of the doubt with Lindzi Wessel and Science Magazine. They are simply lying, along with the rest of the mainstream fake news.

Please form that vaccine safety commission soon, President Trump. We need it now more than ever.

UPDATE: Autism Investigated Video!