Tag Archives: The New York Times

New York Times Lies Autism and Vaccines Were Studied in 15 Million Kids

Carroll The New York Times

Aaron Carroll, MD, MS is a pediatrician and contributor to The New York Times, Credit: Writer Junkie

For every vaccine promoter who drops a whopper of a lie, another comes along to top it. Who better than The New York Times in direct response to President Trump’s statements on vaccination? In The Times’ published and then republished article “Not Up for Debate: The Science Behind Vaccination,” pediatrician Aaron Carroll wrote:

There is simply no scientific evidence that links vaccines to autism. Many, many, many studies have confirmed this. The most recent Cochrane systematic review of research on the MMR vaccine included six self-controlled case series studies, two ecological studies, one case crossover trial, five time series trials, 17 case-control studies, 27 cohort studies and five randomized controlled trials. More than 15 million children took part in this research. No one could find evidence that vaccines are associated with autism.

a statistically significant link found at this point would almost have to be a false positive, given the millions of children already studied.

Contrary to Carroll’s article, 15 million children were not studied for an increased risk for autism from vaccination. The review objective makes that clear:

To assess the effectiveness and adverse effects associated with the MMR vaccine in children up to 15 years of age.

The review analyzed studies relevant to the overall safety and effectiveness of the vaccine. Studies relevant to autism were only a fraction of those in the review. Does it confirm vaccines don’t cause autism as Carroll said? No.

The methodological quality of many of the included studies made it difficult to generalise their results.

Here were the review’s actual conclusions:

The design and reporting of safety outcomes in MMR vaccine studies, both pre- and post-marketing, are largely inadequate. The evidence of adverse events following immunisation with the MMR vaccine cannot be separated from its role in preventing the target diseases.

“Largely inadequate” – that’s what the review concluded about vaccine safety. Carroll cites this review to declare vaccination “not up for debate.” It’s doubtful a doctor with a master’s in “health services research” misread the review abstract. This is someone who would describe himself as “immersed in the science of vaccines”:

It would be better for our vaccination policy for this not even to be a topic for debate, certainly not by those who aren’t immersed in the science of vaccines.

He completely distorted that science, and he’s a total liar. His article should be retracted by The New York Times, not that this crooked newspaper ever will.

Teenage Science Fraudster Is Released on Parole After Showing Remorse

This post is a satirical update from a previous post of Autism Investigated’s two years ago, which was also a satire. The above photo and below quotes of Marco “Arturo” Zozaya are actually from a recent (fake news) New York Times article about him, where he admits his video denying vaccine injury was “quite rude.” The hyperlinks below go to actual stories of fraud by vaccine officials. 

“I look back on it and see that I was actually quite rude,” Mr. Zozaya, now 14, told the parole board about when he refused to show remorse upon his 2016 conviction.

Initially sentenced to 12 years of hard time, Zozaya was released on parole after serving two years. His convictions included embezzlement of federal grants and destruction of evidence that vaccines cause autism.

Convicted at 12, he was expected to serve prison time until the age of 24. That would have put him away for half his life. However, his age, good behavior and subsequent remorse for what he had done were all factors.

The fact that he was on the autism spectrum himself also helped. Zozaya spent most of his time in his cell just keeping to himself.

“He didn’t give us any trouble,” a corrections officer who wished not to be named told Autism Investigated.

“I was really disappointed,” Zozaya told the parole board of he and his co-conspirators’ actions to junk research and intimidate scientists. “I wish honestly that people were as much into science as they are into shutting people down.”

Tell Congresswoman Baloney She Deserves To Lose Her Seat

Office of Congresswoman Carolyn B. M(B)aloney

NY PostA campaign spokesman for Rep. Carolyn Maloney said the congresswoman now “does not believe there is a link between vaccinations and autism.”“Congresswoman Maloney believes in the efficacy and safety of vaccines. She was at the forefront of efforts to protect funding for vaccines in the Affordable Care Act,” the rep said.

And subsequent Post editorial:

It’s a small win for science that Maloney’s admitting the truth[AI note: as if!]. It’ll be a bigger one if she (and others who did the same) apologizes for promoting a deadly myth.

Will wonders never cease? Actually, it seems they just did. The mystery appears to have been solved by a NY Times reporter, of all people.

The last time Autism Investigated asked readers to contact her office years ago, you were all told to be polite. Don’t worry about politeness this time. Express yourself however you deem fit (no threats, of course).

Call Congresswoman Baloney’s DC office, mention the NY Post article and tell them she deserves to lose her seat in the Democrat primary: 202-225-7944

NYT Blames Flu Shot Drop on Trump’s Latino “Hostility”

Couldn’t it just be that flu shots are crap?

Here is the Media Research Center synopsis of NYT’s flu shot debacle:

During Monday’s edition of At this Hour, guest host Brianna Keilar brought on New York Times Health and Science reporter Donald McNeil Jr to discuss the flu epidemic sweeping the nation. McNeil suggested that the President has a racial prejudice against Hispanics that has caused an 8 percent drop in the number of Hispanics who have received flu shots.

Tucker Carlson has also weighed in.


Donald McNeil is not new to vaccine controversies, nor is the comic gold he has produced in showing his idiocy about them. That includes the below 10-year-old email that scrupulously reminded an autism parent of what he called credential-fabricating vaccine doc Paul Offit.

—–Original Message—–
From: Donald G. McNeil Jr. mcneil@nytimes.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 3:34 PM
To: J.B. Handley
Subject: Age of Autism
 
Mr. Handley:
 
Someone at Age of Autism was nice enough to send me a reference to your post.
 
I don’t mind being called completely and utterly clueless, a kool-aid drinker, and so on.   Freedom of speech, “sticks and stones…” and all that.
 
But I did learn something about your own abilities as a journalist.  If you’ll trust my notes and want to correct these statements, you are welcome to:
 
1. I did not tell you I was writing a review.  I told you I was writing an article about the book [Autism False Prophets, by Paul Offit], and its effect on the debate.
 
2. What you said about the death threats and Offit was: “I’ve received, not death threats, but emails threatening my physical safety on numerous occasions.  I just don’t complain about them to all the world like a giant pussy.”   And you condemned them, as you say.
 
3. I did not say that “Looking at unvaccinated kids would be immoral.” I said: “Leaving kids unvaccinated (ie, in order to study them) would be immoral.”  Sounds similar, but there’s a huge difference.  In an email to me, you accused me of saying the first.  I cleared up the misunderstanding in my reply email.  In your subsequent Age of Autism piece, you simply repeated the misquotation, because it made me look stupider than the truth would have.
 
Thanks,
 
Donald McNeil
mcneil@nytimes.com
 

Read this Age of Autism post by JB Handley for details, and get ready for more laughs!