Tag Archives: The Washington Post

Ari Ne’eman Helps Fellow Autistic Muppet Off The Short Bus at Sesame Street

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Ari Ne’eman, real-life Muppet with autism

Julia may be the first Muppet with autism to appear on Sesame Street, but the first Muppet with autism has been around long before the back of the short bus caught any PBS producer’s attention.

The first autistic Muppet was born 10 years ago, when a pimply teen with Asperger’s started a campaign against the NYU Child Study Center. It was not a campaign against the center’s interim director whoring herself out to the federal vaccine program to help it exonerate itself against the families of yet more children it permanently brain-damaged. Rather, the entire campaign was simply against NYU’s advertising related to autism because the ads had offended him. And thus the mainstream media’s own autistic Muppet was born in the baby face of the autistic feelings campaigner named Ari Ne’eman, who could be trotted out at any time to praise the virtues of autism and advocate censoring discussion of the disorder on the pretense of offensiveness. His most recent media appearance was to help fellow autistic Muppet Julia off the Magic Short Bus and into the impressionable minds of young Sesame Street viewers.

Like the Sesame Street Muppets, Ari Ne’eman’s simplistic role and nebbishy look never changed. The dull-but-soft-spoken, chubby-but-clean-cut face of the autism acceptance ideology known as neurodiversity remains as it had in the past with the same talking points and nothing new to offer. In this world of make-believe, autism is normal and there is nothing wrong. It would all be so great, if it weren’t all such a lie.

Julia, like Ari, represents a caricature of the fastest growing childhood neurological disorder in the country. Both send the message that autism is merely a case of social awkwardness as opposed to the debilitating lifelong disability that has robbed so many innocent children of their ability to speak by vaccination. Both send the message that people with autism can just “be themselves” and society and other people will just accept them, no matter how socially off-putting people with autism can be. And both ultimately give people with autism a cop-out excuse – use the mantle of autism to make people feel sorry for you and absolve yourself of any personal responsibility.

Julia and Ari do a disservice to everyone with autism – the really severe whose experiences are simply neglected, and the higher-functioning who are discouraged from taking personal responsibility for their behavior. But unlike Ari, the explanation for Julia can at least be partially explained by ratings.

No young child wants to watch a Muppet who can’t speak and has diarrhea 10 times a day, nor does any such child want to see some awkward Muppet getting bullied into fitting in by bigger, meaner Muppets. Balancing entertainment with reality in this instance is virtually impossible.

Mainstream media has no such excuse for trotting out its own autistic Muppet by the name of Ari Ne’eman for the last decade in order to paint a rosy, unrealistic portrayal of autism. Unlike the ratings-generated Julia, Ari is a Muppet used purely for purposes of spreading propaganda. There is virtually nothing about him that viewers would find genuinely appealing to watch.

FAKE NEWS REVEALED, Part II: The Ghostwriter Behind The Kennedy Retraction

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Scott Rosenberg, ghostwriter behind Kennedy retraction

With President-Elect Trump’s consideration of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. as chair of a committee on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, the shills of fake news have been relentlessly trying to convince Trump’s team to reconsider. The most widely circulated argument has been Salon.com’s retraction of Kennedy’s article “Deadly Immunitywhere he wrote on the government cover-up of the dangers of the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal. The retraction was based on a bogus rumor that Rolling Stone secretly retracted Kennedy’s article and was later condemned as editorial cowardice” by Salon.com’s founding editor-in-chief David Talbot. But now there is even more news that should bury the retraction of Kennedy’s work once and for all in this exclusive two-part series by Autism Investigated: the Salon.com editor-in-chief who took credit for the retraction of Deadly Immunity didn’t even read it, didn’t write its retraction statement and didn’t interview the person who started the rumor as portrayed on Salon.com. The first part of the series provided proof that he didn’t, this second part reveals who did.

That person is the MediaShift blogger whom the editor-in-chief misrepresented Kennedy’s article to in Part I: former Salon.com managing editor Scott Rosenberg. Rosenberg attended theScience Online 2011 annual conference with the Rolling Stone rumor-starter Seth Mnookin. The event ran from January 13-15 right before the article was retracted on the 16th. Both Mnookin and Rosenberg had books of theirs featured at the conference:

Scott Rosenberg – Not Kerry Lauerman – Interviewed Seth Mnookin

Rosenberg was also still contributing to Salon through 2011 when Kennedy’s piece was retracted. Yet Rosenberg would never disclose that in his MediaShift blog about Salon’s retraction of Kennedy’s article weeks later. Seth Mnookin’s first tweet about Salon’s interview used Science Online 2011 hashtag #scio11 – specifically for tweets Science Online meeting commentary and follow-up discussions – even though Lauerman was never at the conference while Rosenberg was:

 That was the first and last tweet by Mnookin about Salon’s coverage of his book and the removal of Kennedy’s article using the #scio11 hashtag. The purpose of the #scio11 hashtag according to a conference attendee was to denote tweets about Science Online 2011 “meeting commentary and follow-up discussions” by conference participants:”One goal of the conference was to be as inclusive as possible by livestreaming several of the sessions online and encouraging liberal use of the Twitter hashtag, #scio11, for meeting commentary and follow-up discussions.” Mnookin was also trying to score interviews at Science Online 2011 to pitch his book prior to the conference:

A Twitter search for both Mnookin and Rosenberg’s Twitter handles reveals substantial interaction between them at Science Online 2011, as well as Rosenberg tweeting about Salon’s retraction of his piece almost immediately after it happened. In contrast – Lauerman had no participation in Science Online 2011; a search with the #scio11 hashtag and his twitter handle yields nothing. Lauerman was not even in virtual attendance, despite it being an option for conference participants who could not physically be at the conference. He simply was not there at all.

Lauerman’s Motive For Retraction: Payback to Rosenberg in Exchange for Career Advancement

Kerry Lauerman had quite a rapport with Scott Rosenberg going back many years, specifically concerning the project Lauerman launched that was Rosenberg’s idea. This is what Rosenberg said about Lauerman in 2008:

“The Open Salon that opens its doors today — it’s been in private beta for a while — is an outgrowth of the work I did back then, but of course over the past year the project has evolved much further…It’s the work of Kerry Lauerman and his team — and, now that the participants are using it, it’s in the hands of Salon’s readers the people formerly known as Salon’s readers, to make of it something new and exciting.”

The implementation of Rosenberg’s idea by Lauerman was followed by his rapid accession to editor-in-chief just two years later. So naturally, Lauerman would feel indebted to Rosenberg which would in turn be a motive for Lauerman having Kennedy’s article retracted to please Rosenberg if Lauerman felt Rosenberg’s idea got him the highest editorial position. Lauerman not having personally interviewed Mnookin, read Kennedy’s piece or wrote Salon.com‘s retraction statement would also explain why Lauerman refused to even take Kennedy’s calls the night Lauerman told Kennedy via email that Salon.com would retract his piece on the night of the 15th – the last night of the conference attended by Mnookin and Rosenberg. 

Interestingly – following the retraction – Rosenberg went on to run the annual Science Online conferences regularly attended by Mnookin until the organization became insolvent and shut down in 2014. Lauerman did not read Kennedy’s article when it was pulled, did not interview Mnookin and likely yanked “Deadly Immunity” as a favor for a friend with strong Mnookin connections. Yet now years later, the result of this crooked behavior is used as justification to block Robert F. Kennedy Jr. from becoming chair of a badly needed commission to stop the ongoing harm being committed against innocent infants. Fortunately, the president-elect and the vice president-elect both seem pretty happy to have Robert F. Kennedy Jr. on their team.

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*Please send this article to the president-elect and vice president-elect*

FAKE NEWS REVEALED, Part I: Salon Editor Who “Retracted” Kennedy’s Article Didn’t Even Read It

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Kerry Lauerman, Salon.com editor-in-chief who deleted Robert F. Kennedy Jr. ‘s article without even reading it, is now executive “news” editor of Mic.

With President-Elect Trump’s consideration of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. as chair of a committee on vaccine safety and scientific integrity, the shills of fake news have been relentlessly trying to convince Trump’s team to reconsider. The most widely circulated argument has been Salon.com’s retraction of Kennedy’s article “Deadly Immunity”where he wrote on the government cover-up of the dangers of the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal. The retraction was based on a bogus rumor that Rolling Stone secretly retracted Kennedy’s article and was later condemned as editorial cowardice” by Salon.com’s founding editor-in-chief David Talbot. But now there is even more news that should bury the retraction of Kennedy’s work once and for all in this exclusive two-part series by Autism Investigated: the Salon.com editor-in-chief who took credit for the retraction of “Deadly Immunity” didn’t even read it, didn’t write its retraction statement and didn’t interview the person who started the rumor as portrayed on the site. This first part of the series provides proof that he didn’t, the second part will reveal who did.

That editor, Kerry Lauerman, has since made quite a career out of running outlets that delivered fake news. In 2014 he was hired by The Washington Post and in 2015 was made the newspaper’s National Projects Editor. Among Lauerman’s roles, according to the newspaper, would be “the planning, execution and coverage of some critically important events during the political year, such as the presidential debate and forum we’re co-sponsoring with Univision, and in guiding our preparations for the political conventions.” During that stint of Lauerman’s at WaPo, the now-president-elect stripped the newspaper of its press credentials because of its dishonest reporting.

Then the month before the election, Lauerman left the newspaper to become executive “news” editor of Mic – a creepy far-left site aimed at millennials that makes sensationalized stories out of the way men sit in subways. He still edits Micwhere he now pushes garbage rumors about the president-elect while he still attacks Kennedy.

Proof Lauerman Didn’t Read “Deadly Immunity”

A blog post for MediaShift dated January 24, 2011 provided a quote of Lauerman’s following the retraction. It proves Lauerman’s basic grasp of both the article and the context of the Kennedy quote he provided was so poor, Lauerman could not have read the article he censored:  

“It’s a seriously flawed story we feared could do real harm. People who have bought into the anti-vaccine panic have created a health crisis, and a flawed report that feeds that hysteria poses a real threat. With this particular story, the unproven logic that animates the piece — as when Kennedy says the link between thimerosal and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real’ — is not easily excisable, and no matter how many editor’s notes or Drudge-like, red-flashing sirens you place on a story to warn readers, there will be those who will take a well-known, respected American at his word. We simply didn’t think it was worth that risk.” (boldface mine) 

How Lauerman quoted Kennedy’s article to justify its retraction completely contradicts how the retraction statement quoted that same sentence in his article on Salon.com:   

In 2005, Salon published online an exclusive story by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. that offered an explosive premise: that the mercury-based thimerosal compound present in vaccines until 2001 was dangerous, and that he was convinced that the link between thimerosal and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real.” (boldface mine)

The intro to Salon.com’s interview with Seth Mnookin – news fabricator extraordinaire who started the rumor that Rolling Stone canned Kennedy’s article – also contradicts the context in which Lauerman quoted Kennedy:  

In 2005, we published a report, “Deadly Immunity,” by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. that appeared in Rolling Stone magazine (Salon had a co-publishing arrangement with the magazine at the time), in which Kennedy wrote that he became convinced that the link between thimerosal [a mercury-based compound once used in vaccines] and the epidemic of childhood neurological disorders is real” (boldface mine)

The only apparent place that misleadingly quoted Kennedy’s article the same way Lauerman did in 2011 was a CBS Moneywatch piece that also helped spread the false rumor that Rolling Stone pulled Kennedy’s article. That would mean Lauerman only read that piece instead of actually reading Deadly Immunity”.  And as one can see from a search result, there do not appear to be any other January 2011 sources that chopped the quote from Kennedy’s article to look like an absolute statement the way Lauerman did. The only way for Lauerman to have reasonably misrepresented Kennedy’s piece and quoted it out of context the way he did would have been for Lauerman not to have read his article and to have only read the CBS Moneywatch article with the chopped quote from Kennedy’s piece. Had Lauerman even bothered to read “Deadly Immunity”, he would know that his whole claimed pretense for retracting it was totally false. But the facts didn’t matter to him, as they continue to not matter to Salon.com. 

Since his reasoning is contradicted by both the retraction statement and the Salon.com interview as well, that would mean Lauerman did not write or conduct them either. But if he didn’t do either for Salon.com, who did? That will be revealed in Part II of this series, where the ghostwriter will be outed.

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*Please send this article to the president-elect and vice president-elect*

Jill Stein: “I’m not aware of evidence linking autism with vaccines.”

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Thinking of going Green this election cycle? Think again.

Presumptive Green Party nominee Jill Stein has just tweeted that she is “not aware of evidence linking autism with vaccines.” Her comments came days after a Washington Post interview where she punted a question about whether she believes vaccines are linked to autism, but it now appears that she has finally caved:

Her comments are not entirely surprising for someone who invited Bernie Sanders to take over her own presidential ticket. Sanders has said the evidence against a vaccine-autism connection was “overwhelming” and criticized GOP nominee Donald Trump for acknowledging a connection. In stark contrast to both Stein and Sanders, Trump is very aware of evidence for a connection that they won’t acknowledge exists – bringing out the issue not only in his tweets but also in a presidential debate for the very first time and continuing to speak out on the campaign trail as recently as four months ago. Trump has been outspoken about the issue for years long before running for president.

The choice in this election could not be clearer. Crooked Hillary Clinton mocked skepticism of vaccines and proclaimed in her nomination speech, “I believe in science,” to imply Trump does not. Also this summer, Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson called Barack Obama a “good guy” and Crooked Hillary “wonderful” – in stark contrast to saying he could never support Donald Trump because of “all the things he had said”. Even more nauseating, Johnson’s running mate Bill Weld described having a “bond” with her.

Of course, voting for a third-party candidate is basically the same as not voting at all and letting Crooked Hillary win anyway. Even still, there is only one candidate on the right side of this issue and his name is Donald Trump.

Salon Founder: “Deadly Immunity” Retraction “Smacks of Editorial Cowardice”

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Photo credit: Salon.com

By Jake Crosby

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has an article up on his personal website that gives fascinating insight into the retraction of his piece “Deadly Immunity” by Salon.com, including a letter from the site’s founder. In his letter to Kennedy last month, Salon.com founder and former editor-in-chief David Talbot condemned Salon’s retraction of Kennedy’s 2005 article on the government cover-up of harm – such as autism and other developmental disorders – caused by thimerosal. The piece was retracted in 2011 by Salon’s then-editor Kerry Lauerman, who said at the time, “We’ve grown to believe the best reader service is to delete the piece entirely.” Talbot slammed Lauerman’s decision, saying – among other criticisms – that it “smacks of editorial cowardice”:

I was dismayed when I first heard that Salon had removed your article about the hazards of thimerosal from its web archives. As you know, I was no longer the editor of Salon when your article was published. And I am not an expert on the subject. But without taking a position on mercury preservatives in vaccines, I know enough about the debate — and about the pharmaceutical industry’s general track record on putting profits before people, as well as the compromised nature of regulatory oversight in this country when it comes to powerful industries — to know that “disappearing” your article was not the proper decision.

I founded Salon to be a fearless and independent publication — one that was open to a wide range of views, particularly those that were controversial or contested within the mainstream media. Removing your article from the Salon archives was a violation of that spirit and smacks of editorial cowardice. If I had been editor at the time, I would not have done so — and I would have offered you the opportunity to debate your critics in Salon’s pages.

In my day, Salon did not cave to pressure — and we risked corporate media scorn, advertising boycotts, threats of FBI investigations by powerful members of Congress, and even bomb scares because of our rigorous independence. Throwing a writer to the wolves when the heat got too hot was never the Salon way. It pains me, now that I’m on the sidelines, to ever see Salon wilt in the face of such pressure.”

Rolling Stone Magazine also published Kennedy’s piece, but never retracted it even after the magazine’s editors reviewed Salon’s explanation for the “Deadly Immunity” retraction and the book that prompted it: “Panic Virus,” by Seth Mnookin. It was Mnookin’s book that gave rise to the rumor that Rolling Stone secretly retracted Kennedy’s piece, which Rolling Stone has since dispelled.

Now that Mnookin’s self-described personal friend Kerry Lauerman has taken his editorial cowardice over to The Washington Post, Salon’s current editor-in-chief David Daley should do the editorially courageous thing and restore “Deadly Immunity” to Salon’s archives. Not doing so would make him just as much of an editorial coward as Lauerman.

See on The Epoch Times.

Did Andrew Wakefield Out The CDC Whistleblower For Money?

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By Jake Crosby

Five months have elapsed since senior CDC scientist Dr. William Thompson – who spoke out about the suppression of research results linking autism to early measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine administration – was prematurely outed without his permission by de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield. Yet one question still lingers: why did he do it?

The answer may lie in what Wakefield’s critics have accused him of being motivated by for the last decade: money.

Much of Wakefield’s personal income comes from his role as president of the Strategic Autism Initiative (SAI), a non-profit he runs for the purposes of funding autism research. However, only a small portion of SAI’s contributions actually went to autism research; the vast majority went into his pocket according to SAI’s latest available 990 form. He had also solicited donations for a libel suit he filed in Texas that was eventually dismissed on jurisdictional grounds where he was ordered to pay defendants’ legal costs.

Contributions for both Wakefield’s lawsuit and his non-profit came from the very community of parents of vaccine-injured children who Wakefield claims to be helping. His image and relevance to that community are what help him receive money from that community. As his lawsuit was winding down, his hijacking of the CDC whistleblower story gave Wakefield just what he would have needed to reinvigorate his hero role to the very people who had come to follow him so devoutly. It would also give him yet another reason to solicit money from his supporters.

What started as the release of online videos that mentioned the whistleblower by name and included surreptitious recordings of his voice became a two-month campaign to raise money for a documentary film Wakefield said he was making about the whistleblower saga. Yet only $2,325 – far below the lofty goal of $230,000 – was actually raised. And despite an ongoing campaign by Wakefield’s supporters to circulate the whistleblower story on Twitter and other social media sites, those efforts have had no appreciable impact on the story’s exposure. Nonetheless, Wakefield succeeded in galvanizing support for himself from his own community of followers even though his interference in the story likely eliminated any chance of widespread media coverage.

Now in 2015, prospects of the whistleblower William Thompson being able to testify about the CDC’s role in suppressing research associating autism with MMR vaccination before Congress appears to be supported by little else than rumors on blogs. A recent outbreak of measles in Disneyland has led to The Washington Post among other papers blaming the outbreak on Wakefield, dubbing him the “high priest” of the “anti-vaccine movement” despite never mentioning Thompson or any other examples of misconduct at CDC.

15 years after a researcher at CDC concluded a causal vaccine-autism association in email to colleagues while studying the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal, media focus remains fixed on Wakefield thanks in no small part to his own actions. Not only does that benefit CDC, but Wakefield also stands to benefit by the reinforcement of his image as a “martyr” to his support base that still provides him with sympathy and financial backing.

Tragically, the people who do not benefit at all while suffering the most from this ongoing narrative are the very community of people that is still largely misguided enough to keep following him without examining his possible motives.

Addendum: See on The Epoch Times.

Dr. Boyd Haley on Deletions from Kennedy’s Book: “Those were the most important chapters for the American people to see.”

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By Jake Crosby

Mercury toxicity expert and chemistry professor emeritus Dr. Boyd Haley has joined Dr. Andrew Wakefield as yet another prominent scientist who has spoken out against the censorship of book chapters by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Though Age of Autism quoted Dr. Haley as supporting Kennedy in the wake of much media criticism, he was not aware Kennedy chopped chapters including those on autism from his book when speaking to Age of Autism.

“I was just recently made aware of this,” he said. “Needless to say this is very disappointing news.”

“I’m just dramatically disappointed,” Dr. Haley later reiterated again concerning the removal of chapters and sections from Kennedy’s book, Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak. “There was no reason to take chapters out.”

Referring to the excuse cited in The Washington Post that sections of the book were “too combustible,” Dr. Haley responded: “I think that’s a weak excuse. It’s supposed to be a combustible book.”

Dr. Haley went on, “I’m really kind of in shock. It never crossed my mind he’d [Kennedy’d] take those chapters out.” Noting he played a major role in assisting Kennedy with his book, Dr. Haley also stated, “He never consulted with me before he did.”

Regarding the chapters Kennedy took out, Dr. Haley said: “Those were the most important chapters for the American people to see.”

He noted, however, that the issue of thimerosal concerned more than just autism: “Sweden’s Sudden Infant Death Syndrome rate went down after thimerosal was taken out.”

Quantifying the scope of infant death rates in the US, Dr. Haley said, “If we had Sweden’s [death rate], we’d have 16,000 less [infants] die,” per year.

Dr. Haley was also perplexed about Dr. Mark Hyman who convinced Kennedy to strike chapters:

“I don’t know Hyman at all.”

Dr. Haley was also shocked to learn that one of Kennedy’s ghostwriters Adam Hadhazy previously defended thimerosal, asking:

“Why would he hire someone like that to ghostwrite his book?”

Referring to the Washington Post article interviewing Kennedy and Hyman, Dr. Haley said he was most disappointed in how they responded to claims that autism went up as thimerosal was removed:

“That’s a huge mistake to say autism went up as thimerosal was taken out,” he stated. “They don’t have data [on children born] past 2002. The shelf life of some of those vaccines is five years.”

He further noted that thimerosal remains in flu vaccines given to infants and pregnant women, acknowledging that unpublished data from a CDC-commissioned study showed prenatal thimerosal exposure increased risk for regressive ASD 8-fold.

Haley concluded, “If you can’t counter that argument, then you’re not making an argument. You’re shooting from the hip.”

He also said of the CDC’s autism surveillance, “It’s not accurate, and it’s not a well-designed system.” Indeed, it does not track the same regions, nor can its estimates be generalized to the rest of the country.

Pointing out more generally that CDC is not credible and often lies, Dr. Haley noted, “These people play fast and loose with the facts. The real problem we have is that they’re not honest people.”

Then referring to his issues with autism organizations in general and of Autism Investigated’s coverage of some of those groups, he said:

“I get so frustrated working with autism groups. You shed a lot of light on it.”

Just before word broke that Kennedy pulled the chapters, Dr. Haley said Kennedy called him asking if he knew of a study from Iceland that supposedly proved thimerosal did not cause autism. Dr. Haley said he hadn’t seen it and neither had Kennedy, “but he sounded convinced by it,” Dr. Haley told me. Kennedy did not reveal to Dr. Haley who told him about it, though someone close to Kennedy is apparently working hard to make him doubt that thimerosal causes autism.

Yet a study from Denmark published last year showed a decline in autism after thimerosal’s removal. One of the authors on that study was copied on an email exchange a decade earlier noting the prevalence and incidence was declining. This exchange was discussed in one of the autism chapters Kennedy took out of his book, titled  “Autism Rates Decline When Thimerosal Exposure Levels Are Reduced.”

Dr. Haley stated that Kennedy’s book should have been a call to action for the removal of thimerosal, but believed that to be undermined by Kennedy’s new decision to strike the chapters and backtrack from his position that thimerosal causes autism.

Towards the end of the conversation, Dr. Haley promised:

“I’ll support you in what you’re trying to do.”

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Joins Thimerosal Cover-up

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By Jake Crosby

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has made the fateful decision to remove chapters on autism in his upcoming book “Thimerosal – Let The Science Speak” (unedited version available) concerning the mercury-based neurotoxic vaccine preservative thimerosal. According to an article in The Washington Post:

Some of the most controversial sections — the chapters connecting autism to thimerosal — Kennedy took out at the last minute, though there are still references to a link to autism. Hyman convinced him that such claims were too combustible and would distract from the book’s core argument, that “the evidence suggesting a link between thimerosal and a large percentage of neurodevelopment disorders … mandates action.”

Except that autism is the most serious of those neurodevelopmental disorders caused by thimerosal. The person who convinced Kennedy – his coauthor Dr. Mark Hyman – is a profiteer of alternative “therapies” for autism. He has even discussed treating a child with autism for elevated mercury levels and has an obvious stake in attracting more patients like that to his practice.

Meanwhile, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. betrayed the very people he spoke about his book to at last year’s AutismOne conference. He kept them waiting for his book to come out while deliberately delaying publication for one year, only to remove the chapters on autism “last minute.” In doing so, he has in-effect joined the very CDC cover-up of thimerosal’s harms that he previously denounced by censoring incriminating evidence on the premise of it being “too combustible.” Thankfully, the unpublished, unedited manuscript of Kennedy’s book is also available.

Please click the following hyperlink for the Thimerosal_Kennedy book: unedited, unpublished and uncensored.

Distribute it to as many people as you can, and tell them of the censorship Kennedy has committed by sharing the following link: http://tinyurl.com/nwv6jd5

Addendum, August 4, 2015: Kennedy is putting the chapters back in! Links to the unpublished manuscript have now been replaced with links to the Amazon listing of the “Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak” paperback edition, which will include the original omitted chapters on the autism link! For an uncensored version of Kennedy’s book, order the paperback copy!

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.