Tag Archives: Thimerosal

FDA Commissioner Cites Measles Importation Advocate Peter Hotez

Farmer Scott

SKINNY JEANS: Dr. Scott Gottlieb visiting farms and dressing the part. Twitter of FDA Commissioner

The FDA commissioner who told Congress that Danish fugitive Poul Thorsen definitively debunked the vaccine-autism link is at it again. Scott Gottlieb is now citing the work of measles importation advocate Peter Hotez.

We are already at a dangerous tipping point, thanks to toxic vaccinations. Gottlieb cited propaganda of vaccine developer Peter Hotez, who has encouraged the importation of measles by opposing President Trump’s immigration policies. Hotez called vaccine skeptics and anti-vaccinationists a “hate group” and has written in favor of compulsory vaccination. He is in denial of his daughter’s vaccine injury.

Even Scott Gottlieb knows immigration can spread disease. Here is what Gottlieb wrote in 2008 (despite wrongly saying mercury is in the MMR vaccine):

…measles can still be imported from countries where its incidence is widespread. (The Brooklyn strain was probably introduced by immigrants.)

Gottlieb cites a man who wants to eliminate American borders to spread measles and scare people into poisoning their kids. Meanwhile, look who Gottlieb is seated next to: the former Maryland Secretary of Health who led attacks against vaccine scientists. Gottlieb said he “made transparency a priority at #FDA under his leadership.”

Read that again:

We’re fully committed to continuing to embrace and promote transparency at #FDA.

No, you’re not.

Major Opponent of Vaccine Safety Commission Conspired Against Scientists

Former Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein left, with FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb. Twitter of FDA Commissioner

Last year, Joshua Sharfstein wrote an article in JAMA vocally opposing the creation of a vaccine safety commission under President Trump. Entirely undisclosed in his article was the conspiracy Sharfstein led against two scientists for their views on vaccine safety while he was Maryland Secretary of Health. Autism Investigated subsequently contacted JAMA‘s editor-in-chief. JAMA‘s legal counsel responded instead.

From: Jake Crosby
Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2018 4:41 PM
To: Howard Bauchner
Subject: Joshua Sharfstein’s Undisclosed Conflict of Interest and Conspiracy Against Scientists
Dear Dr. Bauchner,

Last year, you ran an article by Joshua Sharfstein that opposed the Trump Administration’s commitment to vaccine safety.(1) Dr. Sharfstein omitted that as Maryland Secretary of Health, he led state government attacks on two vaccine researchers for their opposition to thimerosal in vaccines.(2)(3) By the time of Sharfstein’s article, a court ruled that the department he led violated their confidentiality by posting public their medical information.(4) Just last February, that same board Sharfstein was in charge of was ordered to pay them $2.5 million for its actions under Sharfstein’s leadership. The ruling judge even compared the actions of Sharfstein’s board members and staff to Watergate:

“If their testimony were to be believed, which the court does not, it is the worst case of collective amnesia in the history of Maryland government and on par with the collective memory failure on display at the Watergate hearings.”(5)

Sharfstein acknowledges in his article that a vaccine safety commission under Trump would also concentrate on scientific integrity. He has much to lose professionally and personally from the formation of such a commission due to his department’s conspiracy against two scientists for their views on vaccines. Given AMA’s organizational stance against the commission, it is all the more pressing for Dr. Sharfstein to disclose his department’s attacks on two scientists for their vaccine skepticism when he defends the existing public health system that he is a part of in JAMA.

Sincerely,

Jake Crosby, MPH

Disclosure: I have done my epidemiology thesis on vaccine safety with the Geiers in 2013 and received funding from Autism Media Channel and Children’s Medical Safety Research Institute. I was also a paid campaign field representative and a volunteer for President Trump and other Republican candidates during the 2016 election cycle. I edit AutismInvestigated.com.

1. Vaccines and the Trump Administration https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2614172

2. In the Matter of Mark R. Geier, M.D.: Order for Summary Suspension of License to Practice Medicine, P. 5, Clause 8. April 27, 2011. https://www.mbp.state.md.us/bpqapp/Orders/D2425004.271.PDF

3. “O’Malley Ousts David Geier from autism commission,” by Frank D. Roylance Baltimore Sun, May 20, 2011.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/health/bs-hs-geier-autism-commission-20110520-story.html

4. “Court rebukes board for publicizing doctor’s confidential info,” Professional Licensing Report, February 11, 2016.
http://www.professionallicensingreport.org/board-in-trouble-for-public-release-of-doctors-confidential-info/

5. “Regulators who targeted anti-vaccine doctor may pay millions for humiliating him,” by Fenit Nirappil. Washington Post, February 3, 2018.

From: Joseph Thornton <Joseph.Thornton@jamanetwork.org>
To: Jake Crosby
Cc: Howard Bauchner <Howard.Bauchner@jamanetwork.org>
Sent: Fri, Jun 8, 2018 7:23 am
Subject: RE Joshua Sharfstein’s Undisclosed Conflict of Interest

Dear Mr. Crosby,

The Maryland Board of Physicians [MBOP] includes 22 members who are appointed by the Governor, not the state’s secretary of health. Complaints regarding Dr. Geier were filed with the MBOP years before Dr. Sharfstein was appointed Secretary. The documents you submitted and the timelines within them do not support the allegation that Dr. Sharfstein “led state government attacks on two vaccine researchers for their opposition to thimerosal in vaccines.”

Sincerely,

[Description: cid:image001.png@01CF9202.5B3F03C0]

Joseph P. Thornton, JD
Editorial Counsel
AMA Plaza, Suite 39300
330 N. Wabash Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611-5885
312-464-4609
joseph.thornton@jamanetwork.org

________________________________

From: Jake Crosby
To: Joseph.Thornton <Joseph.Thornton@jamanetwork.org>
Cc: Howard.Bauchner <Howard.Bauchner@jamanetwork.org>
Sent: Fri, Jun 8, 2018 5:53 pm
Subject: Re: Joshua Sharfstein’s Undisclosed Conflict of Interest

Dear Atty. Thornton,
 

Maryland’s Secretary of Health plays a direct role in the appointment of the majority of board members (boldface mine):

“11 practicing licensed physicians, including 1 Doctor of Osteopathy, appointed by the Governor with the advice of the Secretary of the Department of Health (MDH)”

“1 physician representative of MDH nominated by the Secretary(1)

 
A vaccine activist filed a complaint against the board in 2006, but the board suspended Dr. Geier’s license in 2011 only months after Sharfstein’s appointment. That timeline absolutely implicates Sharfstein’s role. The suspension also cites the Institute of Medicine’s 2004 report that attacked Dr. Geier’s research. Sharfstein writes about IOM in his JAMA article:
 
These reports blunted national concern and were one reason why the major outbreaks that occurred in Europe around that time (and since) have not been seen in the United States.
 
Sharfstein also leaves out of the article, his JAMA bio and disclosure statement that he was elected a fellow of IOM in 2014. 
 
Not only does the timeline of Sharfstein’s appointment correlate with Dr. Geier’s suspension, but Sharfstein’s resignation correlates with court decisions against the board. He announced in July 2014 that he would step down at the end of the year. According to the Professional Licensing Report article I cited, a board representative stood up a deposition by the Geiers’ attorney in June of 2014. The court would then grant the “ultimate sanction” in favor of the Geiers in December 2014, two weeks before Sharfstein actually stepped down.(2)
 
Joshua Sharfstein is completely conflicted. The kind of behavior his department engaged in and the fact that AMA’s and other physician groups’ positions are influenced by people like him is exactly why we need an independent commission to look into vaccines. Until that happens, I think the public should oppose them entirely. 
 
Sincerely, 
 
Jake Crosby, MPH
 
1. About the Board, Maryland Board of Physicians, Maryland Department of Health. Accessed June 8, 2018.
 
2. Anne Geier et al. v. Maryland Board of Physicians et al. Md. 371761-V, 1-11 (Circuit Court for Montgomery County, MD 2014)
 
 

Pro-Vaccine Meta-Analysis Double-Counts All Children Born in Denmark Between 1991 and 1996

table pro-vaccine meta-analysis

Taylor, Swerdfeger, Eslick Pro-Vaccine Meta-Analysis, Table 1

The total sample evaluated among these cohort studies consisted of 1,256,407 children. WRONG

A widely reported, pro-vaccine meta-analysis of papers by vaccine promoters double-counted every child born in Denmark between 1991 and 1996. As a result, it was erroneously reported as being a study of over 1.2 million children by Autism Speaks, CNN, Forbes and David “Orac” Gorski among other bastions of integrity.

In “Vaccines are not associated with autism: an evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies,” the authors estimated the total number of children in the cohort studies by adding up the samples of each study. The problem is that the two largest studies used mostly the same children, as the first table in the meta-analysis makes clear.

Here is one study population description:

All children born in Denmark from January 1990 until December 1996

Here is another:

All children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998

Every child born in Denmark from January 1991 to December 1996 was double-counted. As a result, the authors calculated the total children who participated in all five studies as numbering 1,256,407.

That number is completely bogus. It is not even possible to calculate an estimate of the number of children who participated in either Danish study by reviewing the published manuscripts. Not surprisingly, the authors’ grasp of the material they analyzed reflects their grasp of the vaccine issue overall.

…due to the controversial nature of the topic and the high volume of publication on this issue for both sides of the argument it is unlikely that so many papers on one side of the argument (that would have met our inclusion criteria) remain unpublished.

It is precisely because this issue is controversial that “so many papers on one side of the argument” don’t get published! There’s literally an entire website dedicated to unpublished study results showing that mercury in vaccines causes autism. You publish anything critical of vaccines, it is at imminent risk of retraction for criticizing vaccines. You submit even a letter to the editor saying that someone else’s study linked vaccines to autism, your letter gets canned.

Don’t worry about it though, because the senior author of the pro-vaccine meta-analysis is a cautious parent. His two oldest children got febrile seizures after vaccines, so what does he do? He vaccinates his youngest anyway after giving the child Tylenol.

My first two children have had febrile seizures after routine vaccinations, one of them a serious event. These events did not stop me from vaccinating my third child, however, I did take some proactive measures to reduce the risk of similar adverse effects. I vaccinated my child in the morning so that we were aware if any early adverse reaction during the day and I also gave my child a dose of paracetamol 30 min before the vaccination was given to reduce any fever that might develop after the injection. As a parent I know my children better than anyone and I equate their seizures to the effects of the vaccination by increasing their body temperature.

What do his Harvard colleagues say about that?

The use of acetaminophen in babies and young children may be much more strongly associated with autism than its use during pregnancy, perhaps because of well-known deficiencies in the metabolic breakdown of pharmaceuticals during early development. Thus, one explanation for the increased prevalence of autism is that increased exposure to acetaminophen, exacerbated by inflammation and oxidative stress, is neurotoxic in babies and small children. This view mandates extreme urgency in probing the long-term effects of acetaminophen use in babies and the possibility that many cases of infantile autism may actually be induced by acetaminophen exposure shortly after birth.

He’s as bad a parent as he is a scientist.

Globalist Health Father Rapidly Expanded Dangerous Vaccine Mandates

Bill Foege at the UN

Bill Foege, AP

Smallpox: it only infected humans, and it was only contagious when it made them sick. Isolate a sick person: it doesn’t spread, globalist lies notwithstanding.

But smallpox vaccines are great, a globalist would say. They eradicated smallpox! There’s even a man behind them to take credit! No not the creds-faking shadow vaccine “safety” chief‘s early-20th century counterpart.

His name is William Foege, CDC director under Jimmy Carter. Foege is father of “Global Health,” or why our government sacrifices American children with mercury to protect U.N. vaccine programs.

State vaccine mandates before Carter: 11. Mandates after: 50!

This is why so many more kids got hurt and killed by vaccines in the eighties. This is also why you can’t sue vaccine makers. It’s why combined vaccines like MMR are much more in vogue and why the schedule has expanded so much.

child hours after his MMR vaccine, who developed neurological damage

Vaccine-injured child, what Foege can really take credit for!

The airhead at Vox who interviewed him conveniently left all that out. He said vaccine injuries were fake. In fact, they’re real. Reporting that truth is what got a doctor disbarred. The decision itself said so (p. 43):

You knew or ought to have known that your reporting in the Lancet paper of a temporal link between the syndrome you described and the MMR vaccination, i. had major public health implications, ii. would attract intense public and media interest.

No wonder vaccines are causing so much harm. No wonder people look the other way as the government blatantly lies. Overt censorship of any reasonable concern about them is acceptable.

It shouldn’t be. It won’t be. Autism Investigated is proudly anti-vaccine.

Vaccine mandates and the harm they caused, not hostages or inflation, is what Carter will be most notorious for. He’ll have guys like Foege to thank for that for sure.

Hillary Clinton’s State Department Never Put in Paperwork for Vax Fugitive

Chelsea Clinton obsesses over a vaccine-autism scientist who met with the man who defeated her mom. Meanwhile, her mom failed to have a key player in the vaccine-autism cover-up extradited to America after he became a fugitive.

Poul Thorsen was indicted in 2011 when Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. He was principal investigator of U.S. government-supported papers that sought to exonerate thimerosal in vaccines and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine of causing autism. His MMR paper published in NEJM claimed:

There was no association between the age at the time of vaccination, the time since vaccination, or the date of vaccination and the development of autistic disorder.

This graph computed from Thorsen’s results by an independent statistician shows otherwise.

Similarly, his thimerosal study in Pediatrics conflicts with a later study on autism prevalence in Denmark after thimerosal’s removal.

(ICD-9 definition of Childhood Autism incorporated into registry in 1994, hence the disparity with ASD)

It may never be known what Hillary Clinton was thinking in relation to Thorsen as State Secretary. However, she sure made clear what her position on vaccination and Thorsen’s colleagues would be as president during the election cycle.

As president, I will work closely with the talented physicians, nurses, and scientists in our US Public Health Service to speak out and educate parents about vaccines, focusing on their extraordinary track record in saving lives and pointing out the dangers of not vaccinating our children.

“What difference at this point does it make?”

TWITTER: The Best (or Worst) Cringe of National Infant Immunization Week

Editor’s cringe picks for Autism Investigated.

Petey and the Mayor (who censored Vaxxed)

Marxist Medicine

Death Vs. Vaccine Injury?

World Destruction Forum

Moar Intelligent

Brain-Destroying Miracle

Free coffee with your mercury!!!

Don’t agree with me? CHILD MURDERER!

(Still no fraud.)

“I do no research”

Ableist!

RFK Quick To Attack Trump on Vaccines, But Soft on Democrats

Instagram pic of Trump pinata at family gathering from account of Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s daughter, Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. appears to have publicly given up hope on the Trump Administration’s willingness to tackle vaccines, according to The Guardian. The move comes weeks after his nephew delivered the Democrat Party’s response to the State of the Union address, marking a resurgent role of the Kennedy family in politics. It also represents a stark contrast to the appeasing approach RFK took with President Obama and many other prominent Democrat apologists of vaccination.

When news broke that Congressman Joe Kennedy III would deliver the Democrat response to the State of the Union Address, Robert Kennedy was quick to hype the story on Twitter.

Weeks after Joe Kennedy’s statement, Robert Kennedy made these remarks to The Guardian about the current president’s alleged betrayal of vaccine safety:

“We were told President Trump wanted to meet directly with us. Not only did nothing happen, they’ve cut off all communication with people who care about this issue. The administration has decided to go in another direction.”

“I’ve seen a tremendous deflation among a community of parents and children’s health advocates across the country who believed the promises that President Trump made to the campaign, who put tremendous faith in him and now are feeling enormous betrayal and disappointment.”

According to The Guardian, Robert Kennedy has not had contact with the White House for “at least six months.” Around that same time, he disclosed details of his recent meetings with federal officials to STAT NewsAutism Investigated has reached out to Kennedy’s organization World Mercury Project to inquire about the circumstances that led to these disclosures and is waiting to hear back. One cannot help but wonder his motivations for speaking so freely to the mainstream press while trying to sway a president who has been so critical of unwarranted leaks and fake news by that same press.

Throughout the election, Kennedy was a staunch supporter of Hillary Clinton. That was despite her adamant defense of vaccination, even attacking Donald Trump over his statements about the vaccine problem.

Years ago, a doctor close to the Clintons convinced Kennedy to release a chopped version of his landmark book on mercury in vaccines. That failed attempt to sway Senate Democrats, the Obama Administration and an anticipated Clinton Administration faced massive protest from the autism community. Autism Investigated responded by posting the complete manuscript online, taking it down only after Kennedy published the full version one year later.

But despite spending years trying to appease Obama officials, Kennedy is quick to alienate the first president to have openly supported the fact that vaccines cause autism. Kennedy’s decision comes as the permanent position of CDC chief again remains vacant while that same president has the sole authority to fill it with a decent appointment. What Kennedy did could not have been done at a worse time.

WAPO: Med Board Ordered to Pay Millions for Conspiracy Against Dr. Geier

Autism Investigated Note: The Maryland Board of Physicians has been ordered to pay $2.5 million for its Watergate-like conspiracy against Dr. Mark Geier. Read The Washington Post story below for details. (pro-vax tone aside)

Regulators who targeted anti-vaccine doctor may pay millions for humiliating him

 February 3 at 5:19 PM 

Mark Geier built a medical practice in Rockville and a national reputation for propagating the discredited theory that vaccines cause autism. The Maryland Board of Physicians suspended his license seven years ago because he was treating autistic children with a drug considered dangerous for young people and not known to alleviate symptoms of the disorder.

But the regulators who stripped Geier’s credentials are now in the hot seat, ordered to each personally pay tens of thousands of dollars in damages by a judge who says the board abused its power in an attempt to humiliate the doctor and his family. The board posted a cease-and-desist order on its website in 2012 alleging that Geier had improperly prescribed medication for himself, his wife and his son while his license was suspended. In an unusual move, the order named the drugs in question. Online critics of Geier took notice, mocking the doctor and his family in blogs and comments for their use of the medications.

The Geiers say the state publicized those details for vengeance, to punish a doctor with unconventional ideas. State officials say it was an honest mistake.

But Montgomery County Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin sided with the Geiers, awarding them $2.5 million in damages. He called the order a significant breach of medical privacy and accused the board and its staff of failing to preserve emails related to the case and pleading ignorance about the order on the witness stand.

“If their testimony were to be believed, which the court does not, it is the worst case of collective amnesia in the history of Maryland government and on par with the collective memory failure on display at the Watergate hearings,” Rubin wrote in a December opinion.

He ordered 14 board appointees, the board’s lead attorney and the lead investigator on the Geier case to pay half of the damages out of their own pockets, between $10,000 and $200,000 apiece, depending on their net worth.

A spokeswoman for the state health department, which oversees the board, says the agency tries to balance privacy with a responsibility to inform the public of risks.

The defendants, who are appealing the decision, mostly declined to comment or did not respond to interview requests. Three of them told The Washington Post that the judge’s version of the facts was wrong, and accused him of coming down too hard on volunteers who were donating their time.

“I felt Judge Rubin had a bone to pick with the Board of Physicians. Some of the stuff he came up with is outlandish,” said Jonathan Lerner, who left the board last year. “He set the tone for the future that no one else would want to serve on a board.”

Raquel Coombs, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Attorney General’s Officewhich represents the board, said of the ruling: “We believe there are serious errors in both the facts and the law and will vigorously pursue those on appeal.”

Controversial views

Dr. Mark Geier in 2011 (Jed Kirschbaum/Baltimore Sun)

Mark Geier developed a national following and drew widespread criticism — for espousing his belief that thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative formerly used in childhood vaccines, contributes to autism.

Multiple medical groups and judges dismissed his research as seriously flawedand the vaccine-autism link has been repeatedly debunked. But a growing movement that sees vaccine requirements as an intrusion on parental rights has taken hold in California, Texas and other states, emboldened by President Trump’s embrace during the 2016 campaign of the discredited vaccines-and-autism link.

Public health experts consider “anti-vaxxers” a grave threat to one of the most significant medical developments in human history. Some Facebook users share Geier’s videos to urge against flu shots, even amid the worst flu outbreak in nearly a decade.

But it was Geier’s treatment of autistic children that caught the attention of the Board of Physicians in 2006.

Geier believed mercury from vaccines caused early puberty, aggression and symptoms of autism, and that suppressing testosterone with the drug Lupron — which is approved to treat prostate cancer, endometriosis and fibroids, but also is also used to chemically castrate sex offenders — would reverse those effects.

No credible medical research showed this treatment to be effective for autism, the Board of Physicians noted. The board suspended Geier’s medical license in 2011 and revoked it the next year, citing his methods and saying he had misrepresented his credentials. Several other states also revoked Geier’s medical license, and regulators targeted his son for practicing medicine without a license.

Maryland officials continued to track Mark Geier’s activities, according to the lawsuit the Geiers filed in 2012.

Many of the case records remain under seal. But Rubin’s order shows that board staff were tracking blogs and news articles chronicling Geier’s downfall, mocking him and his son in emails and reveling in their humiliation.

When they got a tip that Mark Geier may have still been prescribing medication, they vowed to look into it. Before holding an evidence hearing, board attorney Victoria Pepper drafted the cease-and-desist order.

Rubin described the decision to name the drugs in the order as an extraordinary breach of privacy for an agency that should know better than anyone else the importance of confidentiality in the medical profession. He pointed to emails sent later on during the probe as evidence of the board’s motivation to embarrass the Geiers.

Pepper referred derisively to the Geiers as “Daddy G” and “Baby G” in emails to Josh Shafer, the board investigator leading the probe of the Geiers.

“Maybe we can help make it a bad month” for the Geiers, Shafer wrote back, using a derogatory reference to the drugs they were using.

Timeline

April 27, 2011: Maryland Board of Physicians suspends Mark Geier’s license

Jan. 25, 2012: Board posts order accusing Geier of prescribing drugs to himself and his son while his license was suspended, naming the drugs in question.

Feb. 5, 2012: Attorney for Geiers sends board letter objecting to publication of private medical information

Feb. 22, 2012: Board removes private information from Geier order, but original still accessible online.

Dec. 29, 2012: Geiers file lawsuit against Maryland Board of Physicians

July 11, 2013: Board removes original order from website

Dec. 7, 2017: Montgomery County judge awards $2.5 million to the Geiers

At trial, Pepper said she knew the Geiers’ private medical information would be online as a result of the order, but didn’t think it would be embarrassing. She said she named the drugs to clarify that they weren’t dangerous controlled substances and named the recipients to clarify that Geier wasn’t prescribing the medication or juveniles. The judge called those reasons “fabrications,” adding that “Pepper viewed Dr. Geier and his practice to be so abhorrent that she was willing to do ‘whatever it took’ to tarnish his reputation.”

Pepper, who still works for the board, did not return repeated emails seeking comment.

All but one member of the Board of Physicians who voted to approve the cease-and-desist order on Jan. 25, 2012 later told the judge they didn’t actually read it.

“It is sort of like looking out an airplane window watching the pilot walking around kicking the rubber and pulling on the metal. I don’t have to go behind him and pull it. I trust the pilot to do his job,” testified Paul Elder, an anesthesiologist from Anne Arundel County who was appointed by former governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) in 2003 and chaired the board at the time of the Geier investigation. “I trust the Board staff to do their job and construct a document that was ready for signature.”

Elder, who is no longer on the board, did not return repeated messages left at his medical practice.

A legal battle

The Geiers were horrified when they saw their private business was now available for the world to read. Their then-lawyer Jay Schwartz sent the board a letter calling the disclosure of private medical information illegal, and confronted Elder after an unrelated hearing in Annapolis to underscore his point.

The board uploaded a new version of the orderwith the personal information removed. But the original could still be found by a simple Google search, and was uploaded online by a local television station covering the board’s probe of Geier.

The order stayed online even after an administrative law judge decided the allegations it was based on were without merit — Mark Geier didn’t prescribe the drugs, his son David did and the family threatened to sue.

It was not taken down until July 11, 2013, a day after Rubin held a hearing in the lawsuit.

Mark Geier’s wife Anne, who died in October 2014, said during a deposition a few months earlier that she was “humiliated” by the contents of the order.

“How would you feel if somebody put your medical records up and then they laughed at you and made fun of you?” she said. They humiliate you. The whole thing has just ruined my life.”

Mark and David Geier, who moved to Florida in 2012, declined to comment.

Several board members acknowledged in court that posting private medical information was inappropriate, but said they didn’t take any steps to make sure the order was taken down from the website. In what Rubin dubbed “colossal amnesia,” some board members also said they barely knew Mark Geier — who had been the subject of one of their most high-profile cases.

“The Board of Physicians is not an ornamental office. It is a serious public trust. It was breached horribly in this case,” Rubin wrote in his opinion. “They knew, the court finds, that the problem had not been fixed. The court finds they simply did not care.”

Lerner, one of the former board members, said the reason they didn’t follow up was far simpler.

“We trusted the staff member and IT staff members when they said it was taken down,” he said. “I don’t think I’m responsible to go do a Google search.”

Rubin also criticized the board for failing to turn over key emails about the case, many of which were apparently lost when the agency changed email servers in 2012 or overlooked because officials didn’t properly search their private accounts.

“The negative and unprofessional tone and tenor of the few preserved e-mails is manifest,” Rubin wrote. “It is not believable that other e-mails, had they been preserved, would fare better.”

Only one of the 14 board members ordered to pay the Geiers still serves on the board: Beryl J. Rosenstein, who did not return a message left at his medical practice.

Jim Love, an attorney for the Geiers, suggested his clients were targeted for a simple reason.

“Everyone hates the Geiers because they say bad things about vaccines,” Love said. “I don’t know why it’s so personal.”

LATEST RESEARCH: An Autism Link Wrapped Up In Aluminum?

The Daily Mail(UK) introduces the latest research study as follows:

Aluminium in vaccines may cause autism, controversial new research suggests. 

Autistic children have up to 10 times more of the metal in their brains than what is considered safe in adults, a study found.

Aluminium crosses the membrane that separates the brain from circulating blood and accumulates in cells involved in maintaining a constant internal environment, such as temperature, the research adds.

Study author Professor Chris Exley from Keele University, said: ‘Perhaps we now have the link between vaccination and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the link being the inclusion of an aluminium adjuvant in the vaccine.’ 

Aluminum and mercury exposure from vaccines have both been disputed as causing neurological disorders, including autism. Earlier research on mercury has similarly indicated that it is found at elevated levels in the brains of deceased autistic patients. Over the years, however, more attention has been drawn to aluminum because it remains present in many more vaccines. But its critics have faced their share of pushback, like all contemporary critics of vaccines.

In 2008, Austrian journalist Bert Ehgartner was ejected from his blogging platform for writing critically of aluminum in vaccines. He went on to create a 2013 documentary Die Akt Aluminum (The Age of Aluminum)which took issue with human exposure to aluminum because of its toxicity.

It has been suspected that more vaccines containing aluminum were added to the recommended schedule to mask any observed effects on autism rates from the reduction of vaccines containing mercury. If true, that would give a whole, new meaning to the term “aluminum foil.”

Lilly Exec’s HHS Nomination Leaves Autism Problem to POTUS

Before the election, Donald Trump said of the problem that is the autism epidemic: “I’ll fix it.” He will fix it, not a surrogate.

That is all the more important to remember now that President Trump has just nominated former Lilly president Alex Azar to run HHS. Now more than ever, Trump must be held accountable for his promise.

From FiercePharma:

Ex-Eli Lilly executive Azar wins Trump’s nomination for top HHS post

by Eric Sagonowsky

President Donald Trump has picked a pharma insider to oversee the HHS. Just days after news that Trump was set to select ex-Eli Lilly executive Alex Azar for the U.S. government’s top healthcare post, he tweeted the nomination Monday morning.

Trump picked Azar for the HHS chief position above other candidates such as Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services director Seema Verma and FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, according to press reports on the selection process. Azar, who has served as an HHS deputy secretary during the George W. Bush administration and as Eli Lilly’s U.S. president, will be tasked with advancing the president’s repeal and replace push for the Affordable Care Act and ostensibly with tackling high pharmaceutical prices, an issue Trump campaigned on and has touched on during his time in the White House. But so far, critics contend the Trump Administration’s actions and proposals have only favored the industry. 


RELATED: Trump poised to nominate ex-Lilly executive Alex Azar for top HHS job: report

Trump famously said pharma is “getting away with murder,” and previously crossed party lines to endorse Medicare price negotiations. Still, drug pricing talk hasn’t gotten serious in Congress and four Congressmen wrote to the president last month to say his “inaction” on their Medicare negotiation proposal has left them with no option other than to press ahead alone.

Cowen analyst Eric Assaraf, for his part, wrote in a note seen by Business Insider that even though “Trump specifically called out lowering drug prices in his announcement of Azar, we don’t believe his appointment will mark a change in course in that realm.” After leaving Lilly as part of an executive shakeup earlier this year, Azar formed a consultancy as he explored “new leadership opportunities,” according to an online speaker profile.

Reacting to Azar’s selection, Senate Finance Committee ranking member Sen. Ron Wyden said the president “at every turn … has broken his promises to American families to lower health care costs, expand access and bring down the high price of prescription drugs.” Sen. Wyden said he’ll ask Azar to take “take decisive, meaningful action to curtail the runaway train of prescription drug costs.”

It isn’t the first time President Trump has selected an industry insider for a top government job. The president earlier this year tapped Scott Gottlieb—who was pharma’s top pick by a wide margin—for the crucial FDA commissioner post. During his time at the agency, Gottlieb has won praise for his moves to increase competition and provide relief on pricing, as well as to speed the FDA’s approval process.

Gottlieb’s name was one floated for the HHS chief position after former secretary Tom Price resigned in September, but the FDA commissioner said in a Reuters interview he felt he is “most effective” at the drug agency.

Azar’s nomination is sure to encounter more pushback. On earlier reports that the ex-Lilly executive was under consideration, Public Citizen founder Robert Weissman said if Azar wins the nod, “then Big Pharma’s coup d’etat in the healthcare sphere will be virtually complete.”

Azar has argued against drug price controls in the past, Weissman said at the time, making it “highly unlikely” he would “advance real reform” on the issue.