Tag Archives: Twitter

San Antonio D.A. Nico LaHood Should Endorse Republican D.A. Candidate

San Antonio District Attorney Nicholas LaHood, KSAT

You don’t need somebody that is spending time going off on his own crusade against vaccinations. -Democrat D.A. candidate Joe Gonzales speaking of D.A. Nico LaHood

Now we have someone who doesn’t even live in Texas fund what he thinks is best for us. -Republican D.A. candidate Tylden Shaeffer on George Soros’ contributions to the Gonzales campaign

The Democrat Party has been taken over by George Soros, his Antifa terrorists, his police-despising Black Lives Matter thugs, his fake news and his race hoaxers. In this new dystopian party, federal immigration law is disrespected but Islamic law cannot be criticized. Spreading lies to promote vaccination is encouraged, but criticizing vaccination is forbidden. Look no further than the primary defeat of San Antonio’s DA Nico LaHood, a defeat he correctly summed up in his concession as caused by “$1 million worth of lies.”

Such lies include those spread by fake African-American Shaun King and his Real Justice PAC, funded of course by Soros.

Retweeted by Gonzales:

Non-Texan Soros’ bought Texan friends clearly determined the outcome of the primary.

And look at what this slimy PAC is up to – portraying Gonzales as being “elected” to a public office that he has never earned the right to assume.

Somebody ought to inform the Bexar County Elections Department of what looks very much like electoral fraud, brought to you by Soros. Now after the primary, Gonzales is pining for his money more than ever.

In the meantime, D.A. LaHood should endorse the Republican candidate Tylden Shaeffer. LaHood has already said he won’t endorse his fellow Democrat, so he’s practically halfway there.

Tell Congresswoman Baloney She Deserves To Lose Her Seat

Office of Congresswoman Carolyn B. M(B)aloney

NY PostA campaign spokesman for Rep. Carolyn Maloney said the congresswoman now “does not believe there is a link between vaccinations and autism.”“Congresswoman Maloney believes in the efficacy and safety of vaccines. She was at the forefront of efforts to protect funding for vaccines in the Affordable Care Act,” the rep said.

And subsequent Post editorial:

It’s a small win for science that Maloney’s admitting the truth[AI note: as if!]. It’ll be a bigger one if she (and others who did the same) apologizes for promoting a deadly myth.

Will wonders never cease? Actually, it seems they just did. The mystery appears to have been solved by a NY Times reporter, of all people.

The last time Autism Investigated asked readers to contact her office years ago, you were all told to be polite. Don’t worry about politeness this time. Express yourself however you deem fit (no threats, of course).

Call Congresswoman Baloney’s DC office, mention the NY Post article and tell them she deserves to lose her seat in the Democrat primary: 202-225-7944

Texas Monthly Inadvertently Reveals Hotez Daughter’s Vaccine Reaction

Peter Hotez and daughter Rachel, Texas Monthly

In the December 2017 issue of Texas Monthly, a puff piece about vaccine doc Peter Hotez titled “Peter Hotez vs. Measles and the Anti-Vaccination Movement” was prominently featured. The piece featured details about Hotez’s family life and his daughter Rachel, whose autism Hotez insists was not caused by vaccination. He is even publishing a book devoted entirely to that position. Unfortunately for Hotez, his wife Ann revealed a crucial detail in the article about their daughter that is a telltale sign of an encephalitic reaction to vaccination.

According to the article:

Rachel had an unusually high-pitched cry, and when Ann would pick her up to comfort her, her tiny body would remain stiff rather than nestling into her mother’s arms.

The detail would lend support to an Autism Investigated meme about Hotez being in denial of his daughter’s vaccine-caused autism.

His daughter’s vaccine reaction is a commonly reported symptom by many parents of vaccine-injured children. Those parents include Katie Wright, the daughter of Autism Speaks‘ founders Bob and Suzanne Wright.

(Katie Wright liked the tweet.)

Hotez’s daughter’s vaccine reaction coupled with his ideological devotion to the radical Islam-like extremism of vaccination help explain his vitriol. Such anger was expressed in a recent lecture he gave at Duke University where he said certain vaccine safety and choice groups were “a hate group that hates [our] family and hates [our] children.” He made these remarks the week after the State Department appointed him board member of the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

Autism Investigated has responded to Hotez’s attacks with a letter-writing campaign to the State Department urging them to remove him from his position. There is still no response from the department bureau overseeing his appointment. So please contact the State Department using their general contact form. Use Autism Investigated’s exact letter, but shorten the addressee name to just “State Department.”

Attorney John Morgan Apologizes For Telling The Truth

A high-profile lawyer should not apologize for saying what’s already on the minds of virtually every anti-vaccinationist and vaccination skeptic. But that’s exactly what Attorney John Morgan of Morgan & Morgan did after producing perfectly reasonable tweets and Facebook posts like that which is above.

No, Morgan did not say that autism, ADHD, depression, pain or poor concentration cause school shootings. However, they do cause children to be much more likely to take medications like those he listed above. What all mass school shootings have in common is that the shooters were all on psychotropic drugs.

The idea of drugs causing people to commit homicide is nothing new. Age of Autism‘s late editor Dan Olmsted first became drawn to vaccination issues from his previous investigations of the anti-malarial drug Lariam. At first he thought it was only linked to suicide, only to learn that it could do even worse. The same certainly seems true of numerous other drugs, especially psychotropics.

Just don’t say that. Certainly don’t suggest what causes (*cough* vaccinations *cough*) people to have conditions that get them put on such medication in the first place. One can only imagine what Dan would think of such language-policing insanity that causes people to go from making observations like that above to all-too-familiar dreck like…

The Pathologically Biased Film That Is “The Pathological Optimist”

It is still hilarious that vaccine sock puppet Brian Deer blew up at The Pathological Optimist producer after he declined to be included in the film. Nonetheless, it is not something that any anti-vaxxer or vaccine skeptic should promote. Despite being a “character study” of Dr. Andrew Wakefield according to the film’s producer, it also concludes by taking the position that vaccines are safe. The Pathological Optimist is pathological itself in that it suffers from pathological bias while purporting to be neutral by giving Wakefield a chance to respond to allegations against him. And even on that aspect of the film, it falls short.

So Autism Investigated’s editor took the film’s producer to task multiple times on Twitter:

Only after she was prompted a second time in a tweet supported by multiple people including Rob Schneider did Miranda Bailey finally respond with a deflection:

Told that it doesn’t excuse her from also incorporating facts that would show “100 studies” to be junk, she didn’t respond. Apparently, she didn’t have the budget to travel to Denmark and interview the indicted principal investigator of such “studies.” But even if she didn’t, she did a film on Dr. Wakefield’s documentary Vaxxed knowing that it was about a CDC scientist who admitted to committing fraud in one of those “studies.” Yet to her, such papers (they’re not real studies) are the final word on the topic. And that’s the anti-vaccine standard of being “fair” or “neutral?” Um, no.

But we’re all supposed to promote the film anyway, right? After all, doesn’t it give Wakefield a fair shot at responding to all the smears leveled against him? Oh wait…

Like her “100 studies” excuse, Miranda Bailey makes another bullshit deflection to dismiss Wakefield’s innocence. Here she was confronted with a British government document that exonerates Wakefield, and she said that it was not “credible” because the British government didn’t say so itself. But any idiot could read the document and see for themselves that none of it applies to a 10 year old’s birthday party far from any clinic or hospital. Bailey chose not to, just as she chose to include a list of references to government papers in her film with no context that would show them to be false.


Please Extradite Danish Fraud Poul Thorsen to the US, President Trump!

Office of the Inspector General, Department of Health and Human Services

Last year, Autism Investigated’s editor publicly spoke out at the annual AutismOne  conference in favor of renewed efforts to push for extradition of vaccine-autism link “debunker” Poul Thorsen. This year, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is leading the push to do just that:

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and World Mercury Project Issue Report Regarding New Evidence of Ongoing Corruption and Scientific Misconduct at CDC

Kennedy hopes new evidence and a fresh look at criminal misconduct will result in law enforcement action, rigorous and transparent vaccine safety science, and safer vaccines.

In a new report released September 18, 2017, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and his team outlined various criminal acts on the part of employees and consultants for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) whose questionable ethics and scientific fraud have resulted in untrustworthy vaccine safety science.

Among other information, Kennedy has found additional evidence of criminal activity by the CDC consultant, Poul Thorsen, the author and principal coordinator of multiple CDC studies exonerating the mercury-based preservative thimerosal in the development of autism.

The new evidence, recently uncovered World Mercury Project, shows that Thorsen and his collaborators did not obtain permission from an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to conduct their research, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002 and Pediatrics in 2003. In 2011, The Department of Justice indicted Thorsen on 22 counts of wire fraud and money laundering for stealing over $1 million in CDC grant money earmarked for autism research. The product of Thorsen’s work for CDC was a series of fraud-tainted articles on Danish autism rates that, today, form the backbone of the popular orthodoxy that vaccines don’t cause autism.

In 2009, when CDC discovered that Thorsen never applied for the IRB approvals, staff did not report the errors and retract the studies. Rather, FOIA documents show that CDC supervisors ignored the missteps and covered up the illegal activity.

This misconduct, undermines the legitimacy of these studies, which were used to refute vaccine injury claims in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP). The studies were also used in the NVICP’s “Omnibus” to dismiss 5000 petitions by families who claimed that their children had developed autism from vaccines. These claims, if settled in the claimants’ favor, would have resulted in payouts totaling an estimated $10 billion.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Chairman, stated, “World Mercury Project calls upon Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, to extradite Thorsen back to the U.S. to face prosecution. We also call upon Secretary of Health and Human Services, Dr. Tom Price, to retract the Thorsen-affiliated autism research papers that are the fruit of illegally conducted research.”

Originally published at World Mercury Project

BREAKING: AI Demands Daily Beast Retract Paul Offit Post on Vaccine-Miscarriage Study

Paul Offit has written a post for The Daily Beast arguing that a CDC study of miscarriage and influenza vaccination should have never been published. He bases his argument on his own misrepresentations of the study’s results. Read Autism Investigated’s below letter to The Daily Beast’s editorial team demanding they retract Offit’s post.

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: Paul Offit’s Article Misrepresents Study Findings, Should be
From: <info@autisminvestigated.com>
Date: Sun, September 24, 2017 3:33 pm
To: editorial@thedailybeast.com

Dear Daily Beast,

Your contributor Paul Offit’s latest article “The Pregnancy Vaccine Scare That Should Have Never Been” makes multiple misrepresentations of a recent CDC study on influenza vaccination and miscarriage. Since these misrepresentations form the basis of his central argument that the study should never have been published, Offit’s article is fatally flawed and should be retracted by your publication.

Offit states about a recent study of miscarriage and flu vaccination that the study authors found no overall association with miscarriage and flu vaccination when they had:

“The CDC’s question prior to this study was “Does influenza vaccine cause spontaneous abortions?” The answer to that question was no. It was only after investigators sub-stratified their data to include those who had or hadn’t received a vaccine the previous year that they could find statistical significance.”

This is directly from the study, contradicting Offit’s claim:

“The overall adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.1–3.6)”


As someone who holds a degree in epidemiology (unlike Offit) and has analyzed the database used in this study (also unlike Offit), I can assure you that that is a significant association. The “95% CI” (confidence interval) excludes the number 1.0. Therefore, the answer to their study question would point in the “yes” direction.

This also demolishes his next point about the study, that the association was based on small numbers:

“After the CDC researchers had finished sub-stratifying their data, the numbers were small”, concluding the results due to “the curse of small numbers gleaned from a large database.” But even before the authors had computed their next association from a smaller sample, the association from their full study sample was already significant. But because Offit misrepresented the association as being insignificant, his point about the study’s findings being based solely on small numbers is also wrong.

His very first point was also wrong, too:

“Researchers had studied two influenza-vaccine seasons: 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. The problem of first-trimester spontaneous abortions occurred during the first season but not the second.”

The study itself makes clear this happened in both seasons: “This effect modification was observed in each season”

Because the majority of Offit’s points are based on his own misrepresentations – including all those that discussed the study findings directly – simple corrections are too mild. The entire post should be retracted by The Daily Beast, especially since the purpose of the post was to make the case for why the study should have never been published. In reality, The Daily Beast should have never posted this fatally flawed article by Paul Offit and should now retract it.


Jake Crosby, MPH

Dr. David Gorski Falsely Denies Vaccine-Miscarriage Finding

Crooked cancer doc David Gorski‘s verbose posts can be completely demolished if you can find and refute the one sentence in his posts that attempts to make a real point. That is exactly what was done when Autism Investigated refuted his denying the significance of an association between miscarriage and flu vaccination that was published in a recent study. He falsely described the finding on his blog thusly:

an aOR [adjusted odds ratio] of 2.0 for the 1-28 day window of exposure to the influenza vaccine before miscarriage that was not statistically significant

However, the study itself directly contradicts Gorski’s assertion of insignificance. So AI’s editor took to Twitter to call him out.

And Gorski was also called out on his own blog. Gorski replied with an excuse:

When one writes blog posts in one’s spare time late at night, such things occasionally happen; one occasionally makes mistakes.

Yet none of his supporters caught the error either, including both a doctoral epidemiology student at Johns Hopkins and a Ph.D. epidemiologist. Despite correcting the error in one sentence, Gorski still has yet to correct it in another sentence in that same blog post:

Basically, the study found zero (that’s right: zero, nada, zilch) association between miscarriage and flu vaccination—with one exception: if the woman had consecutively received a flu vaccine containing the 2009 H1N1 virus. 

Never mind the overall adjusted odds ratio that Gorski now acknowledges as being significant. From there, Gorski’s case against the study falls apart: it was not a fishing expedition for statistical association. It found an association per study protocol and attempted to assess that association further.

Further study yielded an association in a subgroup of women who would already have a body burden of mercury from a prior vaccine, making them more susceptible than other women. But Gorski says this is evidence against the association being real!

For years, Gorski has openly supported government officials crookedly hiding scientific results and barring more research of mercury exposure from vaccines. He also claimed he would acknowledge that mercury in vaccines may cause autism if presented with certain evidence, only to refuse when confronted with that evidence years later.

Why Gorski lies about vaccination risks to children may be explained by his own ties to the pharmaceutical industry. But another factor could be much more personal – possible bitterness over his lack of children despite being in a heterosexual marriage. Perhaps the reason for this is biological and not by choice. If so, what better way for him to get back at society for his or his wife’s infertility than to spread lies that can lead to more miscarriages and brain-damaged children?

Peter Hotez Whines and Lies About Autism Investigated Meme on Houston TV

Scene from television station with Autism Investigated meme in background

After Chelsea Clinton came to Peter Hotez’s defense against Autism Investigated’s meme and other “threats,” he continued his whining and lying on Houston television. Hotez said anti-vaccinationists have a “twisted ideology,” and that his autistic daughter is under attack. In actuality, he is using her as the subject of a book he is writing to further his denial of her vaccine-caused autism. The television statement even said there were “implications of violence” the moment they cut to the meme, even though the meme implied nothing of the sort.

Local doctor targeted in vaccination debate

HOUSTON – Dr. Peter Hotez has spent his whole life working on vaccine development, but he world renown doctor now finds himself under attack.

“The anti-vaccine lobby has really stepped it up, both the frequency of their attacks against me and the tenor of the comments,” said Hotez.

The attacks are coming via Twitter, email and phone calls.

“They’re more personal, more mean spirited,” said Hotez.

They’ve even hurled implications of violence says Hotez, but this time the attacks have hit a new low, attacking his daughter who suffers from autism.

“It is very hurtful, but I try not to respond directly and I stick to the scientific evidence,” said Hotez.

Hotez says Texas has become ground zero for the anti-vaccine lobby. He claims their mission is to convince the world vaccines cause autism, and they are using his daughter Rachel as proof.

“There is no controversy, the science is clear,” said Hotez. “There is no link between vaccines and autism. It’s completely phony.”

Hotez is fighting back with a new book, “Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism”. He opens up about his daughter’s journey and how the family has dealt with Rachel’s autism.

The viciousness of the online attacks caught the attention of Chelsea Clinton who retweeted Hotez and offered her support for him and vaccination.

“I do have a lot of support in the science community,” said Hotez. “What I’m not hearing so much is in the way of support from the United States government.”

He says if Texas allows the anti-vaccine lobby to continue spreading lies, it’s children who will be at risk.

“They’re actually putting children in harms way just to support their twisted ideology and that’s something we have to go up against,” said Hotez.

© 2017 KHOU-TV

Chelsea Clinton Defends Peter Hotez From AI Meme “Threat”

Autism Investigated Note: Watch Milo’s 12 Steps to Destroy the Alt-Rightand read his new book Dangerous for a solid background on the “Alt-Right” which Autism Investigated has nothing to do with.

Chelsea Clinton defended Clinton-tied vaccine developer Peter Hotez from a recent barrage of “threats.” One of those so-called threats was a meme created by Autism Investigated and then shared on Twitter.

Peter Hotez’s sharing of Autism Investigated’s meme of himself is what would culminate in recent “Vaxhole of the week” Chelsea Clinton coming to his defense on Twitter. Hotez’s initial sharing of the meme appeared to prompt some hate mail he received, which he would share on Twitter two days later.

Chelsea Clinton apparently took Hotez’s remarks about a “minefield” literally.

Hotez didn’t correct her tweet about “threats.”

So Autism Investigated’s editor confronted Chelsea Clinton with one question.

Autism Investigated will keep readers posted about any updates. Whether she responds or not, the Clintons are still beholden to pharma.