Tag Archives: William Thompson

Jason Chaffetz Triggers Liberal Snowflakes on Vaccine Dangers

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Congressman Chaffetz reacts to snowflake audience getting triggered after he tried explaining to them the concerns raised about vaccine injuries. Other triggers for this audience include but are not limited to: being told the president will be held to the standard of the law and being reminded about where their electricity comes from.

You gotta hand it to Jason Chaffetz. Being a congressman is hard work, but not many things demonstrate that like the town hall full of whiny cry-babies he had to deal with on Thursday night. Among the things the audience gave him crap for: investigating the government cover-up of vaccine dangers.

But it was the entire hour-and-a-half town hall that was difficult to watch, not just the audience’s ignorance on vaccination harms. Chaffetz was shouted down throughout the entire event simply for stating his opinion on a number of issues when asked by the audience. They even shouted him down right after he told an emotional story about losing both parents to cancer. That’s how insufferable these people were.

One so-called teacher asked how she is supposed to “teach” her students about “safe spaces” when the nation isn’t a safe space. Lady, you shouldn’t “teach” students about safe spaces precisely because this nation is not a safe space. Your job is not to give students an earload of make-believe, your job is to teach them.

I was already itching to stop playing the YouTube when at the end, some overweight, neurodiverse autist who clearly couldn’t control his own hand-movements asked a question about the president’s “BS” opinion regarding vaccines. As soon as Chaffetz discussed how concerns were brought to his office, the audience got triggered once again: “Noooooooooooooo!!!! Science! Science! Science!!!!”

Although there is virtually nothing else that the audience full of dirty hippies, feminist harpies and neurodiverse nitwits said in response that is audible, one of those snowflakes alleged the following was asked:

Why yes, as a matter of fact – his name is William Thompson, and he still works as a senior scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What better way to shut these infantilized protesters down than to subpoena him and have him tell the truth under oath? Okay – maybe not shut down, just expose as being even thicker than they come across.

After all, they may never stop crying over this…

So pleased she is not the President. I thanked her for her service and wished her luck. The investigation continues.

A photo posted by Jason Chaffetz (@jasoninthehouse) on

#MAGA

Related:

My Final Exchange with Dan Olmsted: Leaving Progressivism

Vaccines – Tantrum-Based Medicine

Neurodiversity is Social Justice Cancer

Merry Christmas: BMJ Editor Rattled By Photo of Andrew Wakefield with Trump

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Easily-triggered millionaire vaccine industrialist Paul Offit is not the only person in the industry of unsafe vaccines – a.k.a. the vaccine industry – who is having a hard time after the election. British Medical Journal (BMJ) editor-in-chief Fiona Godlee got a Twitter surprise more unpleasant for her than a Christmas stocking full of coal.

Godlee reacted in horror to a photograph of President-Elect Donald Trump standing alongside the exonerated British doctor and Vaxxed director she libeled: Dr. Andrew Wakefield. In response to a tweet of the photo by Autism Investigated’s editor that also challenged the continued archival of her journal in the US National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Godlee replied:

Godlee made international headlines in 2011 when she reproduced two-year old, false allegations which accused Wakefield of fabricating the findings of his landmark paper on autism and bowel disease in children whose health had deteriorated following combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination. Despite accusing Wakefield of committing fraud to make money, Godlee would later admit that she failed to disclose the sponsorship of BMJ by several MMR manufacturers. She would later claim she did not even know those companies made the MMR vaccine at a talk where she also proved herself completely incapable of defending her accusations against Wakefield when publicly challenged at the NIH in 2011:

A defamation lawsuit filed against Godlee and BMJ by Wakefield would later be thrown out on jurisdictional grounds by two judges with undisclosed ties to the vaccine industry, but not before the prosecutors took depositions of the defendants that only further demonstrated the libelous nature of BMJ‘s attacks. Godlee was reminded of that fact by AutismOne – a charity that hosts annual conferences where Wakefield has been a regularly featured speaker:

Now with Donald Trump elected president of the United States, Godlee may find herself with a new problem. That problem could be with her keeping the journal archived in the US National Library of Medicine should she continue to refuse to retract her libelous, conflicted hit-pieces. Yet she could not even defend her accusations at one of the most venerated medical institutions that helps her journal reach doctors both in America and throughout the entire world.

She’d better make the right choice, or else…

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12-Year-Old Scientist Indicted for Vaccine-Autism Link Cover-Up

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Photo Credit: FBI Archives

This post is a vaccine skeptic’s satirical response to a viral video made by 12-year-old Marco Arturo, who presented the “Evidence That Vaccines Cause Autism” as nothing more than blank sheets of paper in order to disparage people who acknowledge that vaccines actually do cause autism.

12-year-old US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) scientist Marco Arturo was indicted after committing fraud by covering up crucial evidence that vaccines cause autism when crafting his review, “Evidence That Vaccines Cause Autism.” The report – sponsored by the CDC and published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) – concluded:  “The evidence favors rejection of causation.”

Findings omitted from the report showed that in African-American children, those who had an autism spectrum disorder were more than twice as likely to receive a measles-mumps-rubella vaccination before three years of age compared to their neurotypical counterparts. They also showed that children who received the highest doses of mercury from vaccinations in their first month of life were 7-times more likely to receive an autism diagnosis than those who received no mercury during that same time period.

But since the vaccine injury-liable CDC paid the researchers to say vaccines were “well, pretty safe,” according to IOM committee chairwoman Marie McCormick, those results were unacceptable. “We are not ever going to come down that it is a true side-effect,” Dr. McCormick said in a secret meeting. And so they didn’t, but the results were so daunting that scrubbing them was difficult.

“It just won’t go away,” Arturo’s CDC colleague Thomas Verstraeten wrote in email. Ultimately, they made the association between the highest exposure category for mercury and autism go away by combining that category with weaker categories. They then claimed they “lost” the original data so that no researchers could replicate it, but in reality they just threw it all into a big garbage can in Arturo’s backyard.

Unfortunately, he and his other colleagues were later ratted out by a senior CDC scientist who was initially in on the scheme with them. So Arturo took $2 million in embezzled CDC grants and fled to Denmark where he now currently awaits extradition from. If convicted, he faces a 12-year prison sentence: equivalent to his entire lifetime.

Dr. Andrew Wakefield on Re-Licensure – “I will now give this very, very serious consideration”

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At the annual AutismOne conference – 26.5 minutes into the below Twitter-linked video of a Q/A session on the documentary Vaxxed – director and much-maligned doctor Andrew Wakefield said he will give “very, very serious consideration” to getting his medical license restored. His comment was met with applause and cheers from the audience, who gave him a standing ovation.

Dr. Wakefield first expressed interest in having his license restored earlier this year, and Autism Investigated received a signed letter from the UK’s General Medical Council (GMC) saying they would consider his application for restoration and “any further supporting evidence” he provides. He then drew criticism from Autism Investigated after saying in a text message that re-licensure still was not a priority for him.

But on the night of May 28th, Dr. Wakefield had a well-received change of tune that couldn’t have come a moment too soon. He was gracious for being reminded earlier that day that it was approval from an ethics committee of the National Health Service (NHS) that the GMC claimed he needed but lacked when he arranged for blood to be taken from children at his son’s birthday party. However, those rules did not apply to those children because they were not patients. So the birthday party allegations are totally nullified.

All the GMC findings that caused Dr. Wakefield’s medical license to be revoked and his papers retracted have really been overturned four years ago. Unfortunately, it is because his medical license remains revoked and his papers remain retracted that he continues to be dismissed. Winning back his medical license would take away those excuses to dismiss him once and for all.

When the audience was done clapping for Dr. Wakefield after he expressed his renewed interest in restoration, he concluded, “If I am vindicated it will give credence to the parents’ story”. Then someone from the audience rose up and said, “the world needs more doctors like you. You need your license back.”

Addendum: Embedded link replaced with embedded video footage of Q/A following Dr. Wakefield’s excellent documentary.

Whistleblower Contact’s Attorney: Andrew Wakefield “Hijacked The Story”

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In a videotaped lecture given to the group “Moms in Charge,” de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield defended his outing of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) whistleblower scientist William Thompson. While silently backing off from the previously dispelled claim that the disclosure was with Thompson’s permission, Wakefield suggested the outing was in cooperation with Thompson’s first point of contact outside the CDC: autism scientist and parent Dr. Brian Hooker. But like Wakefield’s earlier claim, his claim that his outing of Thompson was in cooperation with Hooker is in stark contrast to what really happened according to correspondence with an attorney he had been working closely with.

The below August 22nd-dated email sent to Brian Hooker by Attorney Robert Reeves – who has represented Hooker during his FOIA litigation against CDC and who also sits on the Focus for Health Foundation board with him – tells a story radically different from Wakefield’s. In particular, Reeves reveals that he and Hooker were trying to bring major media coverage for the whistleblower story when it was “hijacked” by Wakefield in contradiction to what he led Hooker to believe in previous discussions:

Brian,

Hoping to talk to you about the Andy Wakefield situation – Andy revealing WB’s name on Robert Scott Bell radio. If this happens it  is about as nonstrategic as you can get.  It may kill the major media’s willingness to report this.  Don’t forget they are all owned by Phama-vaccine.

The last we need is for this to be a story to the autism community which is what Andy is doing.  Andy said on our conference call Saturday that this was your story and he did not want to appear on any shows with you.  He is doing the exact opposite.  He has hijacked the story that you and Focus Autism have worked so hard to get out.

I am sure Barry will call Andy re this is you ask him.

You have to stop him again.  As I told you late last night I will be the bad guy if need be.  You may need to go on CNN or Fox if they are interested and tell your story about the WB and hopefully not have to reveal his name.  It is already out on some Facebook pages.

We need to reveal other things WB has said re things like the flu shot for pregnancy and the false Price paper.  Have you talked to Morgan Spurlock at CNN?

I am tired of setting here stewing since 7 am, so I am going to exercise, probably play tennis.  Will have my cell phone in my pocket, but if running may not hear or feel it, so you may have to call multiple times.

Bob

Unbeknownst to Reeves at the time, Thompson was already outed in a video hosted by Wakefield and further publicized by the Age of Autism blog less than an hour before Reeves’ email to Hooker. What followed days later was the sudden deletion and eventual retraction of his study that confirmed the same results linking early measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccination timing with autism that Thompson and colleagues found but omitted from publication a decade earlier. The whistleblower and the cover-up were no longer the prevailing story in major media coverage, Wakefield’s hijacking and the retraction of Hooker’s paper that soon followed were the new hot-topics instead. Rather than denouncing Wakefield for what he had done, Hooker rewarded Wakefield for betraying Thompson by cosigning a complaint with Wakefield that was sent to the CDC.

Since then, Wakefield’s hijacking has been used to push vaccine exemption-eliminating legislation. And despite Wakefield claiming in his talk that “things are going well,” no visible progress towards Thompson testifying before Congress has actually been made even though nine months have passed since his statement confirming his research misconduct allegations against CDC.

Wakefield’s solution to getting the story out is a documentary he started making and raising money for shortly after Thompson’s outing, which Wakefield promoted and continued to raise money for at his talk. In doing so, attendees of his talk were charged at a rate of $60-per-plate according to the Orange County Register. Previously, he led a two-month campaign to raise up to $230,000 for his documentary. Approximately 1% of that target sum was all that was raised by just 55 people.

Wakefield denied the documentary was financially motivated, but did not reveal the substantial amount of money he pockets from being president of the Strategic Autism Initiative that is reliant on contributions from the same community to which virtually all of his audience members belong. Keeping center stage to that community is what helps drive his financial success.

But perhaps Andrew Wakefield’s strongest motive for hijacking the whistleblower story comes from the misguided and egotistical notion that doing so will hasten his own historical absolving. Instead, it will be postponed because of what he has done.

See on The Epoch Times.

JAMA Study Implicates Early MMR Vaccine in Causing Autism

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Editor’s Note: The hyperlink to the study goes to an archived webpage because the full text version is no longer available on the JAMA website.

By Jake Crosby

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) that is widely touted to argue against the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine’s association with autism actually provides evidence for a connection. Based on computation from the study results for participants with non-autism spectrum disorder-diagnosed (non-ASD) older siblings, children who received a dose of the MMR vaccine before age five had a risk for ASD diagnosis by age five that was 48% higher than in children who did not in analyses that corrected for certain potential biases.

Where both groups received a dose of MMR vaccine – one largely before the bulk of autism diagnoses were made and one following it – the comparison is less likely to suffer from bias that might affect those involving children never vaccinated with MMR or those who received both recommended doses. Parents might be discouraged from giving a child a second dose of MMR or MMR at all if a child had a negative reaction to the first dose or to a dose of a different vaccine. Similarly, parents of children with autism may be more likely to take seriously concerns about vaccinations’ association with autism and more likely to withhold vaccines from their children. These potential biases make studying the timing of MMR vaccination in relation to autism preferable, though the authors of this study did not bother to do this. Nonetheless, the complete data sets from the study are needed to confirm whether the aforementioned association holds when controlling for other variables.

Yet the crude findings are similar to results from a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that was published in the medical journal Pediatrics in 2004 and has also been cited to deny autism’s association with MMR. Those findings showed an odds of earlier MMR vaccination that was more than two-fold higher among African-American children with autism spectrum disorders compared to their non-ASD counterparts of the same race. According to study coauthor William Thompson who has come forward as a federal whistleblower, that finding was omitted from the published manuscript in breach of final study protocol. Pediatrics has refused to consider the paper for retraction, even though it should be considered according to the guidelines in publishing ethics that the journal claims to follow. Now what CDC researchers found more than a decade ago seems to only be confirmed by the results of this much larger study published in JAMA.

The troubling history of epidemiological studies used to disprove the MMR causes autism despite finding associations predates even the CDC study. A 2002 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and even larger than the recent JAMA study yielded results from which a 45% increased risk for autism associated with MMR vaccination was computed, despite concluding no connection. The scientist who computed that risk explained why the association was potentially meaningful in a letter to the journal, but the journal never published it. The principle investigator Poul Thorsen (who also found but did not publish results implicating mercury in vaccines in causing autism) of the NEJM study has since become a most-wanted international fugitive who was indicted on fraud charges.

Even after his indictment in 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) included his study as one of just four to support the IOM’s position that MMR vaccination does not cause autism. Another IOM-cited study published in the Lancet in 1999 showed a relationship between timing of MMR vaccination and parental concern of child development in a sample of children with autism, according to a slide from an IOM-commissioned epidemiological review.

As the studies used to disprove an association between MMR and autism continue to mount, so too does the evidence favoring a causal relationship. A study in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry claiming autism rose as MMR was removed from use in Japan neglected the fact that the rise was correlated to single measles and rubella vaccines routinely given just four weeks apart. Another study published in JAMA in 2001 claimed that MMR vaccination coverage in California rose marginally while autism occurrence exploded, only for other scientists to then point out that the coverage of MMR vaccination given at younger ages also exploded.

The JAMA study is the latest such study to find an association while claiming to find none, and it probably won’t be the last. Its senior author and Drexel University epidemiologist Craig Newschaffer was previously quoted in 2007 by the LA Times as saying, “Those studies just kept piling up that showed no association between MMR or thimerosal exposure and autism…Among the scientific community, it’s pretty generally accepted that there is no link.”

How ironic that studies he cited to say there is no link actually found a link, and then his own study would later find the same.

See on The Epoch Times.

Correction: More information concerning the study results has since come to the attention of Autism Investigated, including the realization that some of the content originally in this post was not accurate. The article has since been updated.

Elizabeth Warren Makes CDC Official Lie to Congress

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By Jake Crosby

Senator Elizabeth Warren – in trying to make a dig at Senator Rand Paul for his remarks about vaccines causing “profound mental disorders” – ended up making a top Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) official lie to Congress. Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, lied about vaccine dangers when cross-examined by Senator Warren. The false testimony was made in a hearing held on February 10th, 2015 by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, which has a history whitewashing CDC’s research misconduct.

Senator Warren asked Schuchat, “Is there any scientific evidence that vaccines cause autism?”

Schuchat said flatly, “No.”

Asked the same question again, only about whether there is any evidence vaccines cause “profound mental disorders,” Schuchat said,  “No, but some of the diseases we vaccinate against can.” She also denied preservatives like thimerosal are toxic at the levels found in vaccines or that the timing of vaccination incurs any increased risk of side-effects.

Schuchat also stated, “Vaccines do not cause autism.”

Schuchat’s dishonest remarks are contradicted by what was first acknowledged within her own branch at CDC at least 15 years ago, that vaccines indeed cause autism according to its own research findings. CDC researchers even prepared a formal scientific abstract of similar results from an earlier analysis that they intended to present at CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service Conference in 2000. Yet CDC denied these findings in a public presentation before the Institute of Medicine (IOM), which was commissioned by CDC to produce a report in 2004 denying any association between the exposure and the outcome in question.

Today, Anne Schuchat’s position is even less tenable now that whistleblower and senior CDC scientist Dr. William Thompson plans to testify before Congress’ House Science Committee about fudging a report to absolve the measles, mumps, rubella vaccination of a role in causing autism. The lead author of that report Dr. Frank Destefano who is currently director of CDC’s Immunization Safety Office even admitted there was a “possibility” that vaccines can cause autism in a recently recorded interview with journalist Sharyl Attkisson.

Why Schuchat would feel so emboldened as to give such blatantly dishonest testimony before the Senate is perhaps best explained by a congressional report released in 2007. The report sought to absolve CDC of wrongdoing in relation to its vaccine safety research concerning autism despite the proof to the contrary, and that report was produced by none other than the Senate HELP Committee.

No wonder the committee was so welcoming of Schuchat’s dishonesty; HELP has been a longtime facilitator of the lies her agency parrots.

See on The Epoch Times.

Correction: Dr. Schuchat’s testimony was not given under oath and was therefore not perjury as this article previously stated.

Obama Contradicts Himself on Vaccines, Paul and Christie Get Slammed

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By Jake Crosby

Likely GOP presidential candidates Senator Rand Paul and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie are being slammed in the media for giving their own honest and consistent positions on the role of vaccination choice, with Paul further slammed for bringing awareness to vaccine injury. Yet it was President Barack Obama who gave contradictory stances on vaccinations in an interview he gave before the Super Bowl in the wake of the Disneyland measles outbreak.

In response to NBC’s Today Show co-host Savannah Guthrie, President Obama gave the following stance on vaccination (boldface mine):

“The science is, you know, pretty indisputable. We’ve looked at this again and again. There is every reason to get vaccinated, but there aren’t reasons to not.”

But then in that same interview, Obama gave as a reason to vaccinate the protection of people who have reasons not to vaccinate (boldface mine):

“…the folks who can’t get vaccinated – small infants for example or the people with certain, uh you know, vulnerabilities that, that can’t get vaccinated – they suddenly become much more vulnerable. They’re counting on us to create this protective fence because most people have been vaccinated.”

It was “certain…vulnerabilities” Obama cited as reasons for why some people cannot get vaccinated shortly after saying there weren’t any reasons to not get vaccinated. Obama then told viewers to listen to the CDC, even though a senior CDC scientist William Thompson recently came out as a whistleblower against the federal suppression of research results associating measles, mumps and rubella vaccination with autism in certain vulnerable children.

Yet the media is attacking Senator Paul and Governor Christie for making the argument that the decision to vaccinate cannot fall solely on the state. Christie’s office was even forced to release a follow-up statement hours after his comments. Rand Paul was further attacked for his commentary on adverse neurological side-effects from vaccination.

Meanwhile, the media praises Obama even after he gave contradictory opinions in the same interview on national television that went completely missed by his own interviewer. Such a glaring double-standard appears to be the fruits of an ongoing campaign by the Obama Administration to censor critics of government vaccination policy in media as first revealed five years ago by his then-HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius in an interview with Reader’s Digest:

“We have reached out to media outlets to try to get them to not give the views of these people equal weight in their reporting…”

HHS officials would later feign ignorance of the veracity of the above remark in response to queries by HDNet journalist Greg Dobbs. However, the CDC has been known to train journalists on how to report hot-button issues such as autism and vaccine safety in which CDC would clearly have a stake.

Whereas in the seventies it was the media that exposed the president’s role in the cover-up of the Watergate scandal, today the media is helping the president prolong the CDC cover-up of vaccine side-effects. That is more than evident in how mainstream media attacks Christie and Paul for their views while giving Obama a hall pass for his misleading statements about vaccine safety on NBC before he told viewers to listen to the CDC.

A chief instigator of the attacks on Christie is none other than the communications director of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) Mo Elleithee, who said in the below statement:

“If he wants to actually be a leader, then he should stop bowing to junk science and take a cue from President Obama by showing leadership that promotes facts and keeps our children and our nation safe”

Ironically, it is Barack Obama who should stop bowing to junk science and show leadership that promotes facts and keeps children and our nation safe. Making consistent and non-contradictory statements would help.

Christie may not be ready to tackle the issue of vaccine safety the way Paul has, but both likely presidential candidates show much more competent leadership than that of the man currently sitting in the White House. The American people deserve far better than Obama or any presidential candidate who adopts DNC’s position on vaccines for that matter.

See on The Epoch Times.

Did Andrew Wakefield Out The CDC Whistleblower For Money?

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By Jake Crosby

Five months have elapsed since senior CDC scientist Dr. William Thompson – who spoke out about the suppression of research results linking autism to early measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine administration – was prematurely outed without his permission by de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield. Yet one question still lingers: why did he do it?

The answer may lie in what Wakefield’s critics have accused him of being motivated by for the last decade: money.

Much of Wakefield’s personal income comes from his role as president of the Strategic Autism Initiative (SAI), a non-profit he runs for the purposes of funding autism research. However, only a small portion of SAI’s contributions actually went to autism research; the vast majority went into his pocket according to SAI’s latest available 990 form. He had also solicited donations for a libel suit he filed in Texas that was eventually dismissed on jurisdictional grounds where he was ordered to pay defendants’ legal costs.

Contributions for both Wakefield’s lawsuit and his non-profit came from the very community of parents of vaccine-injured children who Wakefield claims to be helping. His image and relevance to that community are what help him receive money from that community. As his lawsuit was winding down, his hijacking of the CDC whistleblower story gave Wakefield just what he would have needed to reinvigorate his hero role to the very people who had come to follow him so devoutly. It would also give him yet another reason to solicit money from his supporters.

What started as the release of online videos that mentioned the whistleblower by name and included surreptitious recordings of his voice became a two-month campaign to raise money for a documentary film Wakefield said he was making about the whistleblower saga. Yet only $2,325 – far below the lofty goal of $230,000 – was actually raised. And despite an ongoing campaign by Wakefield’s supporters to circulate the whistleblower story on Twitter and other social media sites, those efforts have had no appreciable impact on the story’s exposure. Nonetheless, Wakefield succeeded in galvanizing support for himself from his own community of followers even though his interference in the story likely eliminated any chance of widespread media coverage.

Now in 2015, prospects of the whistleblower William Thompson being able to testify about the CDC’s role in suppressing research associating autism with MMR vaccination before Congress appears to be supported by little else than rumors on blogs. A recent outbreak of measles in Disneyland has led to The Washington Post among other papers blaming the outbreak on Wakefield, dubbing him the “high priest” of the “anti-vaccine movement” despite never mentioning Thompson or any other examples of misconduct at CDC.

15 years after a researcher at CDC concluded a causal vaccine-autism association in email to colleagues while studying the mercury-based vaccine preservative thimerosal, media focus remains fixed on Wakefield thanks in no small part to his own actions. Not only does that benefit CDC, but Wakefield also stands to benefit by the reinforcement of his image as a “martyr” to his support base that still provides him with sympathy and financial backing.

Tragically, the people who do not benefit at all while suffering the most from this ongoing narrative are the very community of people that is still largely misguided enough to keep following him without examining his possible motives.

Addendum: See on The Epoch Times.

The CDC Whistleblower’s Coerced Apology To Andrew Wakefield

By Jake Crosby

Above is a purported text message exchange between CDC whistleblower Dr. William Thompson and de-licensed British doctor Andrew Wakefield. The conversation allegedly took place on the day Thompson released a public statement confirming his allegations that CDC committed research misconduct in omitting associations of autism with early measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Also confirmed by Dr. Thompson’s press release was that Wakefield outed him without permission to do so, as first reported on Autism Investigated.

This supposed exchange between Thompson and Wakefield, along with another between Thompson and Wakefield’s wife, are often cited to wrongly deny Wakefield betrayed Thompson by outing him. Never considered is the circumstances under which Thompson presumably apologized to Wakefield, where Thompson likely felt heavily coerced into doing so.

By the time he supposedly issued that apology, Thompson learned the hard way that any information he disclosed which was subsequently shared with Wakefield could be publicly released by him anytime at will. Such information includes phone conversations Dr. Thompson had with autism parent and scientist Dr. Brian Hooker, who tape-recorded Thompson without his knowledge. Snippets of those recordings have been released in videos posted online by Wakefield’s Autism Media Channel which was how Thompson was outed in the first place.

Wakefield clearly has no shame in what he did, having previously lied to Autism Investigated that he had obtained permission to release Dr. Thompson’s identity when he had not prior to Thompson’s press release. This lack of permission from Thompson to out him would later be deemed “irrelevant” by Wakefield in an email response to journalist Celia Farber. She had been covering the whistleblower story for The Epoch Times and posted what were purported to be Wakefield’s and his wife’s text message exchanges with Thompson on her personal blog that included what is perhaps his coerced apology to Wakefield.

Apparently agreeing with what Wakefield wrote her, Farber issued the below challenge to Autism Investigated:

“In terms of timeline, Dr. Thompson was kindly inclined toward Dr. Wakefield on Aug 20, 2014 [Note: date is wrong, it was Aug 27, 2014], AFTER the events you describe as treacherous to Dr. Thompson. This is detailed in published texts between the two of them, as well as dr. Wakefield’s wife Carmel. Please square this with your thesis. I am curious. Confused.”

With Thompson now outed to the very people at CDC whom he is blowing the whistle on, among the last things he would want is yet more information he shared to be publicly released by Wakefield prematurely. That would surely be one of the last things Thompson’s lawyers would want as well.

No wonder he may want to make nice with Wakefield. Not doing so could jeopardize Thompson’s position as a whistleblower all the more.

Addendum: See on The Epoch Times.

Correction: Dr. Thompson has never confirmed the alleged text message exchanges between him and the Wakefields. This article has since been altered slightly to reflect that fact.

Jake Crosby is editor of Autism Investigated and a blogger at The Epoch Times. He is a 2011 graduate of Brandeis University with a Bachelor of Arts in both History and Health: Science, Society and Policy and a 2013 graduate of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services with a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology. He currently attends the University of Texas School of Public Health where he is studying for a Ph.D. in Epidemiology.