Tag Archives: Age Of Autism

BREAKING: Italy’s New Government Opposes Mandatory Vaccination Law

The editor predicted that Italy’s new mandatory vaccination law will fuel a populist backlash to the ruling class, writing in The Epoch Times nine months ago:

The voters who elected Trump and rejected Clinton knew where both candidates stood on vaccinations. Similarly, Italian voters will head to the ballots in next year’s election knowing that Italy’s populists stood up for their vaccine exemption rights while Italy’s Democrats stripped them away.

The Italian people made their voices heard by voting the populists into power and voting the ruling Partito Democratico into minority status. Autism Investigated concluded:

Yesterday’s election outcome just astronomically raised the likelihood that the Lorenzin Law will soon be discarded to the ash heap of history.

That likelihood now looks like virtual certainty with the swearing in of Italy’s new government and a new health minister opposed to the mandatory vaccination law. Age of Autism Europe editor John Stone writes:

After months of negotiations Italian have finally managed to form a government based on the Five Star Movement and the Northern League both of whom were opposed to vaccine mandates piloted by Beatrice Lorenzin and the previous center left government –  the new Health Minister, Giulia Grillo, is “In favor of vaccines, but against Lorenzin’s law“.

Lorenzin has left the government. Her law will soon follow.

Attorney John Morgan Apologizes For Telling The Truth

A high-profile lawyer should not apologize for saying what’s already on the minds of virtually every anti-vaccinationist and vaccination skeptic. But that’s exactly what Attorney John Morgan of Morgan & Morgan did after producing perfectly reasonable tweets and Facebook posts like that which is above.

No, Morgan did not say that autism, ADHD, depression, pain or poor concentration cause school shootings. However, they do cause children to be much more likely to take medications like those he listed above. What all mass school shootings have in common is that the shooters were all on psychotropic drugs.

The idea of drugs causing people to commit homicide is nothing new. Age of Autism‘s late editor Dan Olmsted first became drawn to vaccination issues from his previous investigations of the anti-malarial drug Lariam. At first he thought it was only linked to suicide, only to learn that it could do even worse. The same certainly seems true of numerous other drugs, especially psychotropics.

Just don’t say that. Certainly don’t suggest what causes (*cough* vaccinations *cough*) people to have conditions that get them put on such medication in the first place. One can only imagine what Dan would think of such language-policing insanity that causes people to go from making observations like that above to all-too-familiar dreck like…

NYT Blames Flu Shot Drop on Trump’s Latino “Hostility”

Couldn’t it just be that flu shots are crap?

Here is the Media Research Center synopsis of NYT’s flu shot debacle:

During Monday’s edition of At this Hour, guest host Brianna Keilar brought on New York Times Health and Science reporter Donald McNeil Jr to discuss the flu epidemic sweeping the nation. McNeil suggested that the President has a racial prejudice against Hispanics that has caused an 8 percent drop in the number of Hispanics who have received flu shots.

Tucker Carlson has also weighed in.


Donald McNeil is not new to vaccine controversies, nor is the comic gold he has produced in showing his idiocy about them. That includes the below 10-year-old email that scrupulously reminded an autism parent of what he called credential-fabricating vaccine doc Paul Offit.

—–Original Message—–
From: Donald G. McNeil Jr. mcneil@nytimes.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 3:34 PM
To: J.B. Handley
Subject: Age of Autism
 
Mr. Handley:
 
Someone at Age of Autism was nice enough to send me a reference to your post.
 
I don’t mind being called completely and utterly clueless, a kool-aid drinker, and so on.   Freedom of speech, “sticks and stones…” and all that.
 
But I did learn something about your own abilities as a journalist.  If you’ll trust my notes and want to correct these statements, you are welcome to:
 
1. I did not tell you I was writing a review.  I told you I was writing an article about the book [Autism False Prophets, by Paul Offit], and its effect on the debate.
 
2. What you said about the death threats and Offit was: “I’ve received, not death threats, but emails threatening my physical safety on numerous occasions.  I just don’t complain about them to all the world like a giant pussy.”   And you condemned them, as you say.
 
3. I did not say that “Looking at unvaccinated kids would be immoral.” I said: “Leaving kids unvaccinated (ie, in order to study them) would be immoral.”  Sounds similar, but there’s a huge difference.  In an email to me, you accused me of saying the first.  I cleared up the misunderstanding in my reply email.  In your subsequent Age of Autism piece, you simply repeated the misquotation, because it made me look stupider than the truth would have.
 
Thanks,
 
Donald McNeil
mcneil@nytimes.com
 

Read this Age of Autism post by JB Handley for details, and get ready for more laughs!

Brian Deer Rejects Film Offer, Gets Mad He’s Not in Film!

A critical film about Dr. Andrew Wakefield – the first scientist to raise a connection between the Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine and autism – will soon be released. Yet the person mad about its release is his arch nemesis Brian Deer, who is credited with destroying Dr. Wakefield’s professional reputation. So angry was Deer that he even sent a letter and ultimatum to the documentary’s director.

The reason for Brian Deer’s anger? The documentary said he declined to be part of the film, when he did exactly that. When declining the offer, he even cited not being paid as his reason for doing so when he’s spent almost 15 years accusing Dr. Wakefield of being motivated by money.

The Facebook page of The Pathological Optimist provides details:

Miranda Bailey, the director of “The Pathological Optimist,” recently received a letter from journalist Brian Deer. For those who don’t know, Brian Deer was the journalist who originally investigated the paper published in the “The Lancet” written by Andrew Wakefield, and his colleagues. His reporting was instrumental to the UK General Medical Council’s investigation into Wakefield, which ultimately led to the loss of his medical license.

Read below as journalist Brian Deer “man-splains” to director Miranda Bailey how documentary filmmakers “should and should not behave.” He then goes on to accuse her of several fallacies before ultimately making demands and threats:

(From Deer’s letter): “If by midnight, Pacific, Tuesday, I have not received your assurance in these respects, or been offered by you a credible alternative plan to remedy the damage that your “documentary” inflicts on my reputation (presenting me, as you do, as too cowardly to defend my journalism), I will publish this letter to media, as well as to senior independent film makers, festival directors, and others who may be in a position to advise me. I give you four full days to decide and tell me what you are going to do.”

Brian Deer’s full letter is available to read using the link below along with Miranda Bailey’s response. We’re guessing that this is not the “apology” he was looking for.

Click here to read the full exchange between Miranda Bailey and Brian Deer. It’s comic gold.

Time for the folks behind The Pathological Optimist to reconsider who is pathological, and realize it’s not Dr. Andrew Wakefield.

Alison Singer: Autism Parents’ Jewish Ghetto Police

Fake autism charity/pharma front group founder Alison Singer has just made an appearance on Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (who famously said that America does not want Donald Trump to be president). So Autism Investigated has decided to re-run this 2011 Age of Autism post about her by the Deplorable Autist himself. It includes updated links to the vaccine-autism link science she denies exists, the truth behind her “foundation”, and the fact that she prevented autism in her younger child by spacing out of vaccines. In other words, she knows what caused her older daughter’s autism yet collaborates with the pharmaceutical industry to help it injure and kill more children for profit.

Alison Singer: Autism Mom, Pharma Wife

By Jake Crosby

Alison Singer: autism parent, IACC seat usurper, industry front group founder, recent guest on The Dr. Oz Show, and now – loyal Pharma-funded wife. Of course, that’s what she’s always been. We just didn’t know it, until now.

Mrs. Singer is married to Dan Singer, a longtime employee of McKinsey and Company: a global management consulting firm. Singer’s firm sponsors one of the awards given out by the British Medical Journal, which published and even endorsed British Pharmaceutical Industry sock puppet Brian Deer’s false allegations of fraud against Dr. Andrew Wakefield. McKinsey is not Pharma, you might say. True to an extent, but McKinsey’s commitment to the industry is significant. In the “industry practices” category of “client service,” McKinsey and Co. has a whole page on “Pharmaceuticals & Medical Products,” where they offer a wide range of consultation services to the pharmaceutical industry on everything from prescription pharmaceuticals, to over the counter medicines, to biotechnology and medical products and diagnostics. In 2006, in the company’s quarterly, an article was even run entitled “Avian flu: Expanding global vaccine production.” The avian flu vaccine is preserved in 49 micrograms of mercury, approximately twice that of a season flu shot.

But on January 12 McKinsey did more than consult for the pharmaceutical industry; they partied with its leading vaccine spokesman, millionaire vaccine industrialist Dr. Paul Offit. An email invitation sent out by Alison Singer’s group, the Autism Science Foundation, read:

“Please join us for the book launch and signing

at the offices of McKinsey & Company


55 East 52nd Street, 21st floor


New York, NY 10022


Wednesday, January 12, 2011
6P-8P

Hosted by: Autism Science Foundation

RSVP: Julie Martin
Tel. 646-723-3977

Underneath that message is a bio of Paul Offit and next to it is a picture of Offit’s book cover. Below the book cover, it says:

“All proceeds from sales of Deadly Choices will be donated to the Autism Science Foundation”

It’s more than a little odd that McKinsey would be promoting the work of the Autism Science Foundation (ASF). Ever sensitive to the prestige and standing of its partners, McKinsey would seem a more natural partner of Autism Speaks, the Park Avenue charity of the autism world rather than an upstart run out of Singer’s garage (actually, ASF rents Singer a desk and receptionist from a “Sunshine Suites” property in Noho). Understanding their ASF promotion requires understanding McKinsey’s longstanding role in the autism-vaccine controversies.

And McKinsey partners have been closely connected to the debate, up to the highest levels of the firm. Up until recently, McKinsey was headed by Ian Davis, younger brother of GlaxoSmithKline board of directors member Sir Crispin Davis, and twin brother of Sir Nigel Davis – the judge who denied appeals from MMR litigation claimants to have their legal aid continued.

Though Ian Davis would eventually step down from his position at McKinsey in 2009, it was not before Alison Singer resigned from Autism Speaks. Her resignation was prompted by the charity rightfully condemning the IACC’s backhanded removal of research into some pharmacologic etiologies of autism from its mission. Mrs. Singer’s justification was that there are limited funds for autism research that could be better spent, even though Singer supports such funding being dumped into the money pit of genetic research, and even though not only pharmacologic, but environmental factors overall, have been horribly understudied by comparison.

So she founded a front group posing as an autism charity – the Autism Science Foundation – with millionaire pharmaceutical industrialist Dr. Paul Offit. ASF is the only autism research organization founded on the basis of the science it won’t pursue (it’s been “asked and answered, vaccines don’t cause autism”) than that it will do. And despite the fact that she was originally appointed to a public seat on the IACC as an Autism Speaks representative, she was allowed to keep her position as representative of her own corporate fringe offshoot, effectively usurping Autism Speaks’ representation on the committee.

During the time Singer resigned from Autism Speaks and began her front group, Ian Davis was still head of the company where her husband continues to work. Here’s a brief sequence of events. For more than 20 years, Dan Singer has been a loyal employee of McKinsey, joining the company out of Harvard Business School in 1989 and climbing the ladder until being promoted to director in 1994. That same year, he married his Harvard and Yale sweetheart, Alison Tepper, now Alison Tepper-Singer, whom we all know as Alison Singer. She would take up a job at NBC later that year and the couple would have a daughter together.

Then in 1999, Singer quit her job as a vice president of the network when that daughter was diagnosed with autism. She recently told CNN about her decision about giving MMR to her next child:

“I split the vaccine for my second daughter.”

Her second daughter now remains neurotypical. And the choice to vaccinate against measles, mumps and rubella separately seems not to have harmed Singer’s second daughter in any way. So Alison Singer not only followed Dr. Andrew Wakefield’s advice (and conceivably is benefiting from it), but was even an advocate for his cause in the popular press – at least in one instance.

When NBC ran an episode of “ER” in 2001 that featured a child who died of the measles presumably because he was not vaccinated with MMR, Singer reacted with outrage. According to The New York Daily News:

“Alison Tepper Singer, a former vice president in NBC’s desktop video division, faulted the “ER” episode for its “complete belittling of another viewpoint,” she told The News. Singer resigned from NBC in 1999 when her older daughter was diagnosed with autism.

“It was so irresponsible and so callous and so heartbreaking for parents who are dealing with this issue that I found it sad,” she said of the “ER” episode.”

Then in 2003, Ian Davis became McKinsey’s worldwide managing director. In other words, he became Dan Singer’s boss. Did this change of leadership bring a new kind of influence into the Singer household? Only the Singers know for sure. But one thing is clear, that Alison Singer, after previously splitting up the MMR for her younger, neurotypical daughter and speaking out against a biased TV show, began changing her public position about what she thought might cause autism.

Now, I already have a good idea what Alison Singer might say to all this, her reading of the “science” convinced her otherwise. In response to a January 14, 2010 article I wrote about Kevin Leitch speculating that guilt over giving his daughter a vaccine that triggered her autism drove him to finding solace in the neurodiversity movement, Singer wrote the following comment on the Leftbrain/Rightbrain blog:

What a strange story. Many parents question whether vaccines are involved in autism because of the media coverage of the issue, but then they read the science and realize the studies are there and the science clearly indicates no causal role for vaccines. Kev, although I find your point of view refreshing and your posts unique, I dare say you are hardly alone at coming to this conclusion. Jake will have to try harder next time.

 

What a strange position for her to take. Not only did she not read my article but there was already plenty of purported “research” in 2001 claiming to disprove a link between MMR and autism, virtually all of which was thrown out as useless junk science in an international review by the Cochrane Collaboration in 2005, which also conceded the evidence of the vaccine’s safety was “largely inadequate.” Many of those sorts of studies published since 2001, including the CDC’s own study, were actually positive findings reported as negative ones. Perhaps most disturbing of all was the confirmation of vaccine-strain measles virus in the terminal ileums and cerebrospinal fluid of children with autism and bowel disease in the O’Leary paper published in Molecular Pathology and the Bradstreet paper published in JPandS respectively (contrary to the propaganda machine, the later Hornig paper did not falsify these findings). Finally, one would think the HHS concessions of children like Bailey Banks and Hannah Poling who developed autism after their vaccines becoming public knowledge would have ended this debate altogether.

I don’t know what “science” Ms. Singer is referring to, but scientifically, consumers have far more reasons to fear vaccines and the MMR vaccine in particular in 2011 than they ever had back in 2001. Whatever motive the Singers’ would develop for no longer believing the MMR causes autism, it was certainly not scientific. If the twin brother of a person who denied justice to personal injury claimants and the younger brother of a man helping to facilitate a smear campaign against one of the claimants’ expert witnesses became my boss, I would not want to say anything potentially favorable about that witness for fear of jeopardizing my job. I certainly would not want my wife to do the same, either.

Alison Singer had a very different opinion by the time NBC President Bob Wright founded Autism Speaks along with his wife Suzanne compared to her opinion in the Daily News piece in 2001. Whatever changed Mrs. Singer’s mind about what causes autism, it likely happened within a time period no sooner than 2001 but probably no later than 2005 when she joined Autism Speaks. Ian Davis becoming head of McKinsey occurred right in the middle of that, also happening at around the same time his brother Crispin joined Glaxo’s board of directors. She has kept this connection between her husband’s company and the pharmaceutical industry to herself.

Alison Singer cannot honestly call her group an “autism charity” when its activities are focused on promoting and defending drugs (ie vaccines) for the pharmaceutical industry. She has actually traveled with Paul Offit to Atlanta to speak at an immunization conference on how to compel parents to vaccinate recklessly. Autism Science Foundation is a corporate front group with an agenda that predetermines its approach to autism. Its non-profit status should be revoked.

Originally published on Age of Autism

PERVERT ALERT: “Scientist” W. Ian Lipkin Sued for Degeneracy

No, this pervert alert is not for Anthony Weiner. The pervert alert is for vaccine apologist “scientist” extraordinaire Ian Lipkin who is now being sued by his colleague Dr. Mady Hornig. Among the charges are taking credit for her work, preventing her from speaking at public meetings and asking her to diagnose a lesion on his ass! (whut?)

Age of Autism has the goods:

Dachel Wake Up: Columbia Autism Scientists in Butt Ugly Lawsuit

Note: You can read the legal filing here.  Hornig v. Lipkin

May 20, 2017, New York Post: Columbia professor says boss made her inspect his butt

A Columbia University scientist claims her boss — and former lover — repeatedly dropped his drawers and demanded she diagnose a lesion on his butt.

Associate Professor Mady Hornig says her boss at the university’s Mailman School of Public Health also demanded co-credit for her work; kicked her under the table at meetings to keep her from speaking; presented her work as his own, and kept her from getting tenure, Hornig claims in a Manhattan federal court lawsuit.

In 2014, Professor Walter Ian Lipkin, head of the Center for Infection & Immunity, called Hornig into his office and “demanded that she look at lesions on his buttocks,” Hornig alleges. He did so again a year later, Hornig charges.

Lipkin is familiar to us at Age of Autism. I wrote about his Wall Street Journal piece, Anti-Vaccination Lunacy Won’t Stop, where he denounced ‘Vaxxed’ and said Robert De Niro did the right thing pulling it from Tribeca. https://www.wsj.com/articles/anti-vaccination-lunacy-wont-stop-1459721652

“The filmmakers claim they have not stated that autism is caused by the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, known as MMR. However, that is the inescapable message of ‘Vaxxed.’ And it is certainly the stance of Andrew Wakefield, the discredited British researcher who is the movie’s director and co-writer.

(Continue reading at Age of Autism)

JAMA Must Correct Study As Linking Flu Vax to Autism

jamapediatrics_Hooker_2017_le_170006.pdfjamapediatrics_Donzelli_2017_le_170007.pdf

Click each letter to enlarge.

Since the journal JAMA Pediatrics published a study which showed an association between flu vaccine and autism despite concluding there was none, scientists have published letters in the journal to complain. One of those was by Dr. Brian Hooker, biochemist and autism father who was the first person contacted by the CDC’s vaccine safety whistleblower William Thompson.

The study found an elevated risk for autism from flu vaccination in pregnant women during the first month of pregnancy. Yet the authors attempted to explain this away with incorrect statistical methods and then issued the flawed recommendation that no changes in vaccination policy should be made. In 2004, the CDC expanded its flu vaccine recommendations in pregnant women to include the first trimester of pregnancy. Many cite this an an explanation for why the reported CDC prevalence of autism – generally speaking – did not decline as the mercury-based preservative thimerosal had been removed from other vaccines. Thimerosal remains in multi-dose vials of flu vaccine given to pregnant women.

In Denmark, the reported autism prevalence went down by as much as a third as thimerosal was removed from childhood vaccines there during the 1990s. The elevated risk for autism associated with influenza vaccination during the first trimester of pregnancy was 20-25%. The potential implications of such a finding is profound.

The study was conducted by Kaiser Permanente, a Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) that is in partnership with the CDC and other HMOs in a heavily guarded federal research project known as the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD). JAMA journals’ publisher the American Medical Association sent a press release applauding a 2004 report from the Institute of Medicine that the CDC paid to have whitewash associations between vaccines and autism. The involvement of such institutions in the conduct and publication of such a study should only diminish public confidence in its integrity, along with its flawed conclusion and recommendation.

Nonetheless, the conclusion and recommendation should still be corrected. JAMA Pediatrics can be contacted here.

(H/t Age of Autism)

NOW HIRING: The Aut-Knight

aut-knight

Not to be confused with the Alt-Knight

H/t Kim Stagliano from Age of Autism:

I received an email [Autism Investigated never got an email! :,( ] from Joe Pinzone of Optomen Productions in New York asking if we’d share a casting call for a program that’s been a BBC Series and is now coming to the USA called “Employable Me.” The program is about the great difficulty people with mental health and brain “differences” have in finding work.  As our kids age up and out of school into full adulthood, gainful employment may or may not be an option. For instance, my 22 year old daughter is in a day program with volunteer opportunities (she delivers Meals on Wheels). Others who have higher functioning levels work at paid employment.  While our readership tends to have pretty severely affected children, there are plenty of you whose kids may be able to have full employment. And boy, do we wish that for you – for them.  If you’re interested in casting for this program, please contact Joe Pinzone <joe.pinzone@optomenusa.com>.

Preview of the Aut-Knight himself:

According to a casting blurb:

EMPLOYABLE ME seeks to prove that having a neurological condition neurological condition such as Tourette Syndrome, Autism or Asperger’s should be viewed as an ASSET rather than an obstacle in the workplace.

And it’s already doing a hell of a job.

Autism Investigated could not help but contact Optomen Productions to be cast in this new documentary and will keep readers informed of any updates.

My Final Exchange with Dan Olmsted: Leaving Progressivism

It is with great sadness that Autism Investigated relays the announcement that Dan Olmsted – Age of Autism’s founding editor – has passed away. While I have had my differences with him and the Age of Autism site, I will be forever grateful to him for his friendship, advice and platform for my views. I’ve always respected him as a journalist and have never forgotten the excellent work he has done over the years, and I just had a very friendly exchange with him on the day of the inauguration. I will never stop missing him, and I offered my sincere condolences to the entire Age of Autism team. Autism Investigated devoted the entire last week to posts honoring Dan Olmsted, which ended with a proper obituary. Since then, Age of Autism has given Autism Investigated permission to post its final exchange with Dan Olmsted. It is now published here in full. May we all honor Dan’s life by ending the autism epidemic to make America great again! – Jake Crosby, MPH
Hello Dan,
 
How are you doing?
 
I’m writing you because the title of Anne’s post is: “Senators on key panel reject Donald Trump’s skepticism about vaccines” [Senators Reject Trump’s Vaccine Panel], even though there is no indication any of them did directly except perhaps Al Franken. She was probably confused by the wording of the title: Senators on key panel reject Trump’s skepticism about vaccineBut that “key panel” is the Senate HELP committee they serve on; the members were not asked to weigh in on Kennedy’s panel – only on their overall opinions of vaccine safety. It doesn’t mean they outright reject Kennedy’s panel. STAT News didn’t provide their exact questions, so we really have no idea what they asked the Senators or if they even mentioned Trump.
Obviously it’s your blog to do whatever you want with, but at this sensitive time I would say it’s best to correct that. 
 
Happy new year and president.
 
Jake
 
——– Original Message ——–
Subject: Re: Senators Didn’t Reject Kennedy Panel Idea
From: Dan Olmsted 
Date: Fri, January 20, 2017 9:46 pm
To: info@autisminvestigated.com
Cc: amdachel@msn.com

Thanks for writing Jake we will check it out and let you know
 
I join you in wishing trump well. My progressive affinities have moderated lately and I am optimistic, as I have to say you were before the election
 
Best
 
Dan
 ——– Original Message ——–
Subject: RE: Senators Didn’t Reject Kennedy Panel Idea
From: <info@autisminvestigated.com>
Date: Mon, January 23, 2017 12:30 pm
To: “Dan Olmsted” 

My pleasure, Dan. Good post on Trump, btw. I don’t know if you saw my Newt Gingrich post, but he now supports RFK’s commission!
I’ll admit, I was much more optimistic about Trump being a good president if he won than I was about whether or not he’d win in the first place! So glad he did! 
And please dump the SJWs; they’re crazy, and you always struck me as a classical liberal guy anyway.
Best,
Jake 

Little did I know at the time that he would never get my final email to him. The following week, SJWs would burn Berkeley to cancel a talk by another gay journalist who had grown fed up with his community’s politics. Whether our opponents are wearing black ski masks or white lab coats, the best we can do to honor Dan’s life is to never shy from saying what needs to be said. It’s what Dan would want.

Remembering Dan Olmsted: The Journalist Who Taught Me That We Live in The Age of Autism

dan_award_3

It is with great sadness that Autism Investigated relays the announcement that Dan Olmsted – Age of Autism’s founding editor – has passed away. While I have had my differences with him and the Age of Autism site, I will be forever grateful to him for his friendship, advice and platform for my views. I’ve always respected him as a journalist and have never forgotten the excellent work he has done over the years, and I just had a very friendly exchange with him on the day of the inauguration. I will never stop missing him and offer my sincere condolences to the entire Age of Autism team. Autism Investigated devoted the entire week to posts honoring Dan Olmsted, and is now ending with a proper obituary. May we all honor Dan Olmsted’s life by ending the autism epidemic to make America great again! – Jake Crosby, MPH

How many journalists leave mainstream media to devote the rest of their lives to get to the bottom of the fastest growing neurological disorder among children in the United States? Because I can think of only one, and his name was Dan Olmsted.

“His loss leaves a huge vacuum for people who care about public health and children’s health in this country,” said Robert F. Kennedy Jr. “He’s had as much integrity as any reporter I’ve ever met and more courage than any I’ve ever met. He was willing to walk away from his job for the sake of truth.”

Dan Olmsted passed away unexpectedly on January 23rd, 2016 at the age of 64, and is survived by his spouse Mark Milett and sister Rosamund McDonel Augsburger. The news came as a shock to many who knew him, myself included. That shock was compounded by Dan’s unceasing endurance, writing articles non-stop until two days before his death. He left behind an incredible library of articles and books going back over a decade – most about the autism epidemic, and all related to it in some way. Second only to coping with his loss, the biggest challenge for me was selecting which articles of his to re-post for Autism Investigated’s 7-day tribute to his life. There are just so many!

“Here was a true journalist, not a doctor or a scientist, who did what the medical and scientific communities didn’t do but should have done: investigate the cause of autism,” said exonerated British doctor Andrew Wakefield.

Finding some new insight or lead about the age of autism was never a problem for Dan. When I first met him in 2009, he told me about the time he decided to start writing his Age of Autism column for United Press International. His editor was reportedly concerned that he wouldn’t find enough material to keep the column going.

“Are you kidding me? I can write one every week,” he relayed back to me.

That was all the way back in 2005, but he kept the column going for two years straight until leaving the news agency. His commitment to the cause would only escalate in 2007 when he founded his own news website dedicated to the topic he loved writing about so much: AgeofAutism.com.

It was there that I got my start in 2008 when I first began contributing. While I was a contributing editor, I learned so much from him. It is hard to know where to begin. His ability to investigate, uncover and write was unique and unparalleled, and I always benefited from his advice.

But eventually, a rift grew within our friendship. And one day, that rift grew big enough that it forced me to leave and start my own site – thus marking the beginning of Autism Investigated. We had ceased speaking for awhile, with very little communication in recent years. And despite sometimes citing Age of Autism, Autism Investigated had also been critical of Age of Autism’s coverage at times – particularly during the election cycle.

But despite the mixed signals Age of Autism may have sent about our now-president before the election, Dan Olmsted eventually came around to fully embracing President Trump. On the day of the inauguration just three days before Dan’s death, I was fortunate to have had an extremely friendly email exchange with him where he expressed the same optimism about the new president as he would do the next day in his final “Weekly Wrap” post.

But most encouraging of all was his colorful plea at the very end, one that Autism Investigated hopes will soon become a reality again:

…there is much more common in our cause than anything we might occasionally fight over – that the autism epidemic is real, and excessive vaccinations are the cause.

Rebel Alliance, unite!