Tag Archives: Meta-analysis

FAIL: CDC’s “Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism” Page Features Clone-Counting “Meta-Analysis”

Five cohort studies involving 1,256,407 children, and five case-control studies involving 9,920 children were included in this analysis. Abstract of the clone-counting “meta-analysis”

Remember that “meta-analysis” mainstream media cites to claim vaccines were “proven” to not cause autism in over 1.2 million children when the paper actually double-counted every child born in Denmark over a six year period? The clone-counting paper is now being featured on the CDC’s website.

That bogus paper is hyperlinked directly from none other than CDC’s notorious “Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism” webpage. Clicking on it will go directly to the abstract where the bogus “1,256,407” children number is tossed out.

Your tax dollars are being used to push fabricated figures in the name of vaccine safety, what else is new? Well the media has just slammed a newly elected congressman for criticizing the sacrosanct CDC’s vaccine deception. The media is citing that very webpage. The studies themselves are as bad as the meta-analysis pooled from them. The majority of children in the meta-analysis, for example, were part of a study in Denmark where the majority of autism cases started being counted as the mercury-based preservative thimerosal was removed from vaccines. All the others “dozens” of vaccine-autism link-disproving papers are as dishonest as that one. Of course the “meta-analysis” generated to repackage them would be too, as are the vaccine officials in government who promote it and the journalists who further lie about it.

CNN has just reposted a quote by Sanjay Gupta repeating the “1.2 million” myth, proving once again that it earned the title of fake news along with CDC.

Pro-Vaccine Meta-Analysis Double-Counts All Children Born in Denmark Between 1991 and 1996

table pro-vaccine meta-analysis

Taylor, Swerdfeger, Eslick Pro-Vaccine Meta-Analysis, Table 1

The total sample evaluated among these cohort studies consisted of 1,256,407 children. WRONG

A widely reported, pro-vaccine meta-analysis of papers by vaccine promoters double-counted every child born in Denmark between 1991 and 1996. As a result, it was erroneously reported as being a study of over 1.2 million children by Autism Speaks, CNN, Forbes and David “Orac” Gorski among other bastions of integrity.

In “Vaccines are not associated with autism: an evidence-based meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies,” the authors estimated the total number of children in the cohort studies by adding up the samples of each study. The problem is that the two largest studies used mostly the same children, as the first table in the meta-analysis makes clear.

Here is one study population description:

All children born in Denmark from January 1990 until December 1996

Here is another:

All children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998

Every child born in Denmark from January 1991 to December 1996 was double-counted. As a result, the authors calculated the total children who participated in all five studies as numbering 1,256,407.

That number is completely bogus. It is not even possible to calculate an estimate of the number of children who participated in either Danish study by reviewing the published manuscripts. Not surprisingly, the authors’ grasp of the material they analyzed reflects their grasp of the vaccine issue overall.

…due to the controversial nature of the topic and the high volume of publication on this issue for both sides of the argument it is unlikely that so many papers on one side of the argument (that would have met our inclusion criteria) remain unpublished.

It is precisely because this issue is controversial that “so many papers on one side of the argument” don’t get published! There’s literally an entire website dedicated to unpublished study results showing that mercury in vaccines causes autism. You publish anything critical of vaccines, it is at imminent risk of retraction for criticizing vaccines. You submit even a letter to the editor saying that someone else’s study linked vaccines to autism, your letter gets canned.

Don’t worry about it though, because the senior author of the pro-vaccine meta-analysis is a cautious parent. His two oldest children got febrile seizures after vaccines, so what does he do? He vaccinates his youngest anyway after giving the child Tylenol.

My first two children have had febrile seizures after routine vaccinations, one of them a serious event. These events did not stop me from vaccinating my third child, however, I did take some proactive measures to reduce the risk of similar adverse effects. I vaccinated my child in the morning so that we were aware if any early adverse reaction during the day and I also gave my child a dose of paracetamol 30 min before the vaccination was given to reduce any fever that might develop after the injection. As a parent I know my children better than anyone and I equate their seizures to the effects of the vaccination by increasing their body temperature.

What do his Harvard colleagues say about that?

The use of acetaminophen in babies and young children may be much more strongly associated with autism than its use during pregnancy, perhaps because of well-known deficiencies in the metabolic breakdown of pharmaceuticals during early development. Thus, one explanation for the increased prevalence of autism is that increased exposure to acetaminophen, exacerbated by inflammation and oxidative stress, is neurotoxic in babies and small children. This view mandates extreme urgency in probing the long-term effects of acetaminophen use in babies and the possibility that many cases of infantile autism may actually be induced by acetaminophen exposure shortly after birth.

He’s as bad a parent as he is a scientist.